This is the first version of the 2021-22 General Catalog. The final edition and the historical PDF will be published during the fall semester.

This is a list of comparative literature courses. For more information, see Division of World Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

CL:1240 World Literature: Antiquity to 1700 3 s.h.

Reading and analysis of major literary texts from writing's origins to 1700 in the Mediterranean, Asia, and Africa; interrelationship of literature and history. GE: Literary, Visual, and Performing Arts. Same as CLSA:1040.

CL:1241 World Literature: 1700 to Present 3 s.h.

Reading and analysis of major literary texts from 18th century to present in chronological sequence; emphasis on interrelationship of literature and history. Requirements: completion of GE CLAS Core Rhetoric. GE: Literary, Visual, and Performing Arts.

CL:2248 The Invention of Writing: From Cuneiform to Computers 3 s.h.

Invention of writing as one of the most momentous events in the history of human civilizations; how the use of written sign systems, notations, maps, graphs, encryptions, and most recently, computer programs have consequences that reach deeply into all aspects of people's lives; how writing fascinates and delights, fosters reflexive thinking and facilitates development of complex societies, and gives rise to institutions of social power and control; students explore the invention of writing and its consequences in broad international and interdisciplinary context. Taught in English. Same as ANTH:2248, ASIA:2248, CLSA:2048, COMM:2248, GRMN:2248, HIST:2148, IS:2248, LING:2248, TRNS:2248, WLLC:2248.

CL:3131 Undergraduate Reading Workshop 3 s.h.

Analysis of different types of texts—theoretical, cultural, political, philosophical, literary, poetic—and exploration of varying ways to frame and read them. Same as WLLC:3131.

CL:3222 City as Text/Text as City 3 s.h.

Ways of reading cities: how built environments are shaped by history; how European cities differ from American or postcolonial cities; how to map, inhabit, remember, touch, smell, and experience a city; what is a global city; what is a sustainable city; how city spaces are felt in terms of gender, class, race, and ethnicity; models that architects, planners, politicians, and designers use to create habitable spaces; how to think of texts as cities (i.e., as spaces where people congregate, meet, live); research paper that combines class readings with independent research on a city of students' choice.

CL:4800 Seminar in Comparative Literature 3 s.h.

Focus on comparative, interdisciplinary, theoretical, and/or inter-arts topic; topics vary; required for comparative literature major. Taught in English. Same as GRMN:4800, TRNS:4800, WLLC:4801.

CL:4900 Independent Study arr.