This is a list of all criminology, law and justice courses. For more information, see Sociology.

CRIM:1410 Introduction to Criminology3 s.h.

Nature and causes of crime; the criminal justice process, correctional treatment, crime prevention. GE: Social Sciences.

CRIM:1447 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System3 s.h.

Organization and function of criminal justice system in the United States; history, organization, and current practices of policing, criminal courts, and correctional system; sociological and criminological research on major subsystems comprising criminal justice systems.

CRIM:2430 Comparative Criminal Justice Systems3 s.h.

Criminal justice systems around the world; similarities and differences in how justice is defined and operationalized in contemporary legal traditions in terms of police, courts, and corrections examined in light of cultural norms and values; emphasis on link between societal characteristics and legal traditions; differences in defendant rights guaranteed under various legal traditions.

CRIM:2440 Student Practicum in Policing3 s.h.

Practical application of criminal justice knowledge with physical demonstrations and hands-on exercises; physical participation includes defensive tactics, firearms instruction, and violent intruder training; students journal about student police academy topics and present to faculty. Prerequisites: CRIM:1410 or CRIM:1447. Requirements: background check.

CRIM:2460 Policing in Modern Society3 s.h.

History, theory, and practice of policing; exploring the link between officer decision making and department expectations; policing subculture; ethical considerations officers face; policing administration; policing/community interaction; legal issues affecting policing practice; contemporary developments in policing emergent crime types.

CRIM:2470 Research Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice3 s.h.

Introduction to social science research methods in the fields of criminology and criminal justice; techniques necessary for systematic analysis of research questions and program effectiveness; critical evaluation of existing empirical research and sources of criminal justice data; assessment of data quality. Prerequisites: (STAT:1020 or STAT:1030 or ECON:2800 or SOC:2160 or STAT:2010 or STAT:3510 or PSQF:4143) and (CRIM:1410 or CRIM:1447). Requirements: sociology major.

CRIM:2901 Special Topics in Criminology, Law, and Justice3 s.h.

Varied topics in criminology, criminal legal system, gender and violence, global criminology.

CRIM:3415 Global Criminology3 s.h.

Crime and the control of crime at the transnational and sub-national levels of analysis; focus on non-U.S. societies; consequences of economic, political, and cultural globalization.

CRIM:3416 Race, Crime, and Justice3 s.h.

Extent and nature of racial disparities in offending and victimization; interpretation of patterns using various theoretical approaches; examination of race inequalities across many stages of criminal justice process.

CRIM:3417 Community Corrections3 s.h.

Community corrections; probation, parole, intermediate sanctions (boot camps, intensive supervision, electronic monitoring); contemporary issues in community supervision of offenders.

CRIM:3420 Juvenile Delinquency3 s.h.

Theories of juvenile delinquency; individual, neighborhood, and societal explanations of delinquency; research on families, schools, peers, neighborhoods, gangs, and delinquency.

CRIM:3425 Women, Crime, and Justice3 s.h.

Overview of women's experiences with crime and criminal justice system, with reference to experiences of men for purposes of comparison; role of race, ethnicity, and poverty in women's experiences; causes of crime, inequalities in police-citizen interactions, imprisonment, and other aspects of criminal justice system experience. Same as GWSS:3425.

CRIM:3437 American Crime3 s.h.

Prevailing issues in criminology; extent and nature of disparities in offending and victimization, interpretation of patterns using various theoretical approaches; evaluation of crime-control policies.

CRIM:3450 Criminal Legal System3 s.h.

Discretionary decision making in U.S. criminal courts from arrest through sentencing; legal and sociolegal issues relevant to each stage of felony adjudication; sociological and social-psychological theories of decision making in adjudication, empirical research testing these theories.

CRIM:3500 Policies and Procedures of Policing3 s.h.

Basic knowledge and understanding of criminal law, police practices, and procedures that police use as tools to enforce laws in the United States; how criminal laws are interpreted by police officers, attorneys, and the public; students focus on interpreting case law and present arguments to defend their interpretation of the court's ruling. Prerequisites: CRIM:1410 or CRIM:1447 and (CRIM:3415 or CRIM:3417 or CRIM:3420 or CRIM:3425 or CRIM:3437 or CRIM:3450 or CRIM:4400 or CRIM:4420 or CRIM:4430 or CRIM:4440 or CRIM:4450 or CRIM:4460 or CRIM:4901).

CRIM:4400 Internship in Criminal Justice and Corrections3 s.h.

Supervised field work in a criminal justice or correctional agency. Prerequisites: (CRIM:1410 or SOC:1420 or CRIM:1447) and (CRIM:2430 or CRIM:2460 or CRIM:2901 or CRIM:3415 or CRIM:3416 or CRIM:3417 or CRIM:3420 or CRIM:3437 or CRIM:3450 or CRIM:4420 or CRIM:4430 or CRIM:4450 or CRIM:4460 or CRIM:4901). Requirements: criminology, law and justice major or minor, and junior standing.

CRIM:4410 Treatment Interventions in Corrections3 s.h.

Introduction to treatment interventions utilized in the criminal justice system that target some of the special populations seen within the system as a whole; specific populations may include mental health, substance abuse, sex offenders, and domestic violence; emphasis on evidence-based practices and successful program outcomes with focus on identification and discussion of ethical issues and concerns that arise when providing specialized services to this population, as well as the sometimes difficult mixture of treatment and safety/security. Prerequisites: CRIM:1410 or CRIM:1447. Requirements: junior, senior, or graduate standing.

CRIM:4420 Criminal Punishment3 s.h.

Sociological theories and research on criminal punishment; classical and contemporary theories; research on imprisonment and capital punishment.

CRIM:4430 Interpersonal Violence in Society3 s.h.

Extent and nature of interpersonal violence in societies, in general and for specific population subgroups; theoretical explanations for the phenomenon; alternative ways of defining and responding to violence across various social contexts; application of scientific method; relevant literatures from multiple disciplines including sociology, anthropology, criminology, psychology, and behavioral economics; types of violence defined as illegal and those which are deviant but not illegal. Prerequisites: CRIM:1410. Recommendations: SOC:2170 or CRIM:2470 strongly recommended.

CRIM:4440 Sociology of White-Collar Crime3 s.h.

Critical perspectives on causes and consequences of white-collar crime; definitions and types; criminological, social-psychological, and rational-choice theories; political and economic causes of white-collar crime under capitalism and socialism; rates and patterns of white-collar criminality across different social groups (defined by racial, ethnic, class, and gender attributes); control, prevention, and criminal justice response.

CRIM:4450 Juvenile Justice: A Sociolegal Perspective3 s.h.

Examination of social, historical, and legal foundations of juvenile justice system in the United States; adjudication processes in juvenile justice, transfer of juveniles to criminal court, contemporary juvenile court, community-based corrections programs, legalities of juvenile system; current and future directions in juvenile justice.

CRIM:4460 Sociology of Law3 s.h.

Conceptual, historical, and theoretical issues of law and operation of the criminal justice system; theory and research on law and the criminal justice system.

CRIM:4470 Communities and Crime3 s.h.

Why do some neighborhoods have more crime than others? Why do some neighborhoods see increasing rates of crime over time, while others seemingly do not? Although many crime events occur among individuals, scholars have long noted that crime events tend to cluster in neighborhoods and places where people live; students consider explanations for why this spatial patterning occurs; research methods that have been used to learn about crime in spatial context, classic and contemporary studies of this issue, and approaches to crime prevention that involve focusing on neighborhood or place, rather than simply on individuals. Prerequisites: CRIM:1410 or CRIM:1447.

CRIM:4901 Advanced Topics in Criminology, Law, and Justice3 s.h.

Varied advanced topics in criminology, criminal legal system, gender and violence, global criminology.