Undergraduate majors: Asian languages and literature (B.A.); Russian (B.A.)
Undergraduate minors: Asian languages; Korean studies; Russian; Russian and Eastern European studies
Graduate degree: M.A. in Asian civilizations
Faculty: https://clas.uiowa.edu/dwllc/asll/people
Website: https://clas.uiowa.edu/dwllc/asll

The Department of Asian and Slavic Languages and Literatures offers instruction in languages of Asia and eastern Europe as well as in the literatures, civilizations, and cultures of the regions. In addition to offering degree programs, the department welcomes undergraduate and graduate students from across the University to enroll in courses that complement their degree programs or satisfy their personal interests.

The department offers language study in Chinese, Czech, Hindi-Urdu, Japanese, Korean, Russian, and Sanskrit.

Undergraduate students in all majors may satisfy the World Languages requirement of the General Education Program with courses in Chinese, Hindi-Urdu, Japanese, Korean, Russian, or Sanskrit; see "Language for General Education" below. They also may get acquainted with Asia and Eastern Europe by taking any of the department's General Education Program courses on Asian humanities and on Russian and Slavic literature and culture, all taught in English. Entering students may take the department's First-Year Seminars, one on Asian culture and civilization, the other on Slavic culture and civilization.

The Department of Asian and Slavic Languages and Literatures is one of the academic units in the Division of World Languages, Literatures, and Cultures.

Language for General Education

Undergraduate students in all majors may satisfy the World Languages requirement of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Program with course sequences in Chinese, Hindi-Urdu, Japanese, Korean, Russian, and Sanskrit.

Students who have had experience with Japanese or Russian should take the appropriate University of Iowa World Languages Placement Test, which helps determine the level at which they should begin study of the language. Students with backgrounds in Chinese, Hindi-Urdu, Korean, or Sanskrit may receive individual evaluations from the department.

Chinese

The following sequence fulfills the General Education Program's World Languages requirement and is appropriate for students without previous knowledge of Chinese.

CHIN:1111First-Year Chinese: First Semester5
CHIN:1112First-Year Chinese: Second Semester5
CHIN:2101Second-Year Chinese: First Semester5
CHIN:2102Second-Year Chinese: Second Semester5

Students who have participated in ABRD:3411 Iowa in Tianjin after completing CHIN:1111 First-Year Chinese: First Semester and CHIN:1112 First-Year Chinese: Second Semester, and students from Chinese-speaking families who perform exceptionally well in CHIN:1111 and CHIN:1112, may fulfill the World Languages requirement with the following sequence.

CHIN:1111First-Year Chinese: First Semester5
CHIN:1112First-Year Chinese: Second Semester5
CHIN:2103Accelerated Second-Year Chinese: First Semester3
CHIN:2104Accelerated Second-Year Chinese: Second Semester3

Students who have taken CHIN:2103 and/or CHIN:2104 should not enroll in CHIN:2101 and/or CHIN:2102.

Additional course work is available, including advanced Chinese, classical Chinese, and business Chinese. Consult the department for appropriate placement in Chinese language courses.

Hindi-Urdu

The following sequence fulfills the General Education Program's World Languages requirement. Additional courses are available.

SOAS:2101First-Year Hindi-Urdu: First Semester5
SOAS:2102First-Year Hindi-Urdu: Second Semester5
SOAS:3101Second-Year Hindi-Urdu: First Semester4
SOAS:3102Second-Year Hindi-Urdu: Second Semester4

Japanese

The following sequence fulfills the General Education Program's World Languages requirement and is appropriate for students without previous knowledge of Japanese.

JPNS:1001First-Year Japanese: First Semester5
JPNS:1002First-Year Japanese: Second Semester5
JPNS:2001Second-Year Japanese: First Semester4-5
JPNS:2002Second-Year Japanese: Second Semester4-5

Korean

The following sequence fulfills the General Education Program's World Languages requirement and leads to elementary/intermediate proficiency in Korean.

KORE:1101First-Year Korean: First Semester4
KORE:1102First-Year Korean: Second Semester4
KORE:2101Second-Year Korean: First Semester4
KORE:2102Second-Year Korean: Second Semester4

Students interested in Korean language study beyond the General Education requirement may take the third- and fourth-year Korean courses.

Russian

The following sequence fulfills the General Education Program's World Languages requirement.

SLAV:1111First-Year Russian I5
SLAV:1112First-Year Russian II5
SLAV:2111Second-Year Russian I4
SLAV:2112Second-Year Russian II4

Sanskrit

The following sequence fulfills the General Education Program's World Languages requirement.

SOAS:2901First-Year Sanskrit: First Semester4
SOAS:2902First-Year Sanskrit: Second Semester4
SOAS:3901Second-Year Sanskrit: First Semester3
SOAS:3902Second-Year Sanskrit: Second Semester3

Students interested in Sanskrit language study beyond the General Education requirement may take third-year Sanskrit courses.

Related Certificate: International Business

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the Tippie College of Business offer the Certificate in International Business. The program entails study of international business and economics; international relations and institutions; a language; and the art, literature, culture, and/or politics of a geographic area. Students of Chinese, Japanese, Hindi, or Russian are likely to satisfy the certificate's language requirement while completing the requirements for their major. For information about the certificate, see International Business in the Catalog.

Study Abroad

The department strongly urges its students to seek opportunities for summer language study and study abroad to accelerate the language acquisition process. The University's memberships in the American Institute of Indian Studies and the China Cooperative Language and Study Programs consortium help facilitate students' access to quality international programs in India and China. The government of the People's Republic of China offers scholarships for two students to live and study in mainland China each year.

The Iowa in Tianjin Summer Program is a faculty-led Chinese language and culture study program. This program provides students with a comprehensive and balanced curriculum and combines classroom instruction with field trips, language partnerships, and extracurricular activities.

The UI-Nanzan Exchange allows Iowa students to pay Iowa tuition, room, and board while attending the Center for Japanese Studies at Nanzan University in Nagoya, Japan. There also is a cooperative agreement with the Landour Language School in the Himalayan foothills of India. The South Asian Studies Program has a study abroad program in Mysore and Bangalore, India, where students have the opportunity to study a variety of aspects of traditional and modern Indian civilization.

Iowa students participate in summer, semester, or academic year programs in Russian under the auspices of the American Council of Teachers of Russian (ACTR). The association directs academic language training programs in the cities of Moscow, St. Petersburg, and Vladimir.

Many students participate in summer, semester-long, and year-long study abroad programs in India, China, and Japan offered through other U.S. universities. In many cases credit is transferable, and it is possible for a student to study abroad and still complete the Four-Year Graduation Plan. There are many resources available for funding research and study abroad. It also may be possible for students to apply University of Iowa financial aid to their study abroad programs.

Contact the Department of Asian and Slavic Languages and Literatures or International Programs Study Abroad for more information.

Summer Study, Internships

The department offers an intensive course of language study (second year) each summer in which students complete the equivalent of one academic year of study (the equivalent of one course for each of two semesters, totaling 8 s.h.). Scholarships are available for summer intensive Russian.

Students are encouraged to enrich their programs of study through internships designed to combine work experience in Asia or the United States with study or research projects. The University's Pomerantz Career Center maintains a list of internships.

Activities

Student Associations

Students have many opportunities to enrich their studies in Asian languages and literature while living in Iowa City. The University sponsors student associations for students from many Asian countries, including mainland China, Japan, Korea, India, Pakistan, and Taiwan. All University of Iowa students are welcome to join. Various international community groups sponsor cultural events and holiday celebrations throughout the year.

Residence in Living-Learning Community

The Global Mosaic Living-Learning Community welcomes American and international first-year and second-year students who wish to broaden their knowledge of international issues, languages, and cultures. Global Mosaic members live in Mayflower Residence Hall and enjoy a variety of programs on diverse cultures, the arts, fashion, cinema, dining and cuisine, study abroad, and more. Students must apply to live in the Global Mosaic Living-Learning Community; see the Living Learning Communities website.

Language Media Center

The University's Language Media Center provides facilities for language learning, teaching, and research. Equipment in the center includes state-of-the-art computer, audio, and video facilities as well as standard and short-wave radios, tape and cassette recorders, record players, and soundproof recording rooms. An electronic classroom, a soundproof workroom, and a library of tape, disc, and cassette recordings also are available.

University of Iowa Libraries

Since 1960 University of Iowa Libraries has routinely acquired most American titles in Asian studies and selected overseas scholarly publications in English and other Western languages. The Main Library's Asian collection includes approximately 80,000 volumes in Asian languages and about 140,000 Western-language volumes on Asian subjects. The University has been a member of the Library of Congress Foreign Currency Exchange Program for Indian books and periodicals since 1975. The library's nonprint media collection includes a growing number of Asian feature films. A Chinese-Japanese-Korean computer terminal gives students and faculty access to the growing Research Libraries Information Network database in Asian languages.

Asian Languages and Literatures Courses

ASIA:1000 First-Year Seminar1-2 s.h.

Small discussion class taught by a faculty member; topics chosen by instructor; may include outside activities (e.g., films, lectures, performances, readings, visits to research facilities). Requirements: first- or second-semester standing.

ASIA:1040 Living Religions of the East3 s.h.

Religious beliefs, practices in India, China, Japan. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity. Same as RELS:1404.

ASIA:1060 Introduction to Buddhism3 s.h.

Basic tenets, religious paradigms, historical phases important in the development of Buddhism; from the Buddha's life to evolution of Mahāyāna Buddhism; readings from India, Tibet, China, Japan, Korea, Southeast Asia. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity. Same as RELS:1506.

ASIA:1110 Gods, Buddhas, and Ghostly Officials: The Past and Present of Chinese Religions3 s.h.

History of religious beliefs and practices in China; role in modern-day Chinese society; specific case studies that illuminate current situation of religion in China and impact on Chinese society; focus on the still widespread worship of gods and ancestors, the Confucian, Buddhist and Daoist traditions, recent upsurge of Christianity in China, and emergence of new religions (e.g., the Falun gong). Same as RELS:1510.

ASIA:1510 Ghost Stories and Tales of the Weird in Pre-Modern Chinese Literature3 s.h.

Reading of Chinese literature concerning ghosts, marvels, and supernatural from the first millennium B.C.E. through the 1800s; readings analyzed against changing historical and religious contexts. Taught in English. GE: Interpretation of Literature. Same as CL:1510.

ASIA:1602 Civilizations of Asia: China3 s.h.

GE: Historical Perspectives; International and Global Issues. Same as HIST:1602.

ASIA:1604 Civilizations of Asia: Japan3-4 s.h.

GE: Historical Perspectives; International and Global Issues. Same as HIST:1604.

ASIA:1606 Civilizations of Asia: South Asia3-4 s.h.

Civilization of a vast region that includes India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, and Sri Lanka. GE: Historical Perspectives; International and Global Issues. Same as HIST:1606.

ASIA:1704 The Languages of Asia in Cultural and Historical Perspective3 s.h.

Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Sanskrit and Hindi; cultural and ethnic factors which have affected and are affected by each language; nontechnical introduction to the structure of the language, discussion of the script in which the language is written, and the history of the language, including a brief outline of the political and cultural history of each pertinent linguistic area and the ways linguistic history has been affected by these factors.

ASIA:1770 Asian Humanities: Middle East3 s.h.

How the self has been constructed in literary texts from premodern and modern Islamic world.

ASIA:2202 Classical Chinese Literature Through Translation3 s.h.

Reading of English translations of classical Chinese literature; discussion of major translators of Chinese to English and trends in translation of the premodern literary tradition. Taught in English. Same as CL:2202.

ASIA:2231 Introduction to the Art of China3 s.h.

Visual arts of China and their history; emphasis on understanding in context of Chinese civilization, history. Same as ARTH:2220.

ASIA:2444 Envision India3 s.h.

Introduction to world view and civilization of the South Asian subcontinent, not as a timeless and isolated culture, but as a dynamic and interactive part of evolving global cultural exchanges.

ASIA:2450 India Beat: The Aesthetics and Politics of India Today3 s.h.

Ways in which music forms a crucial part of Indian public sphere, reflecting and shaping culture, society, and economy; wide range of genres commonly performed and heard across India and South Asia today (i.e., film music, several folk forms, classical, semi-classical, Indipop, rock) and locating each of them in their respective historical, cultural, and socioeconomic contexts; exploration of themes and questions (i.e., emergence and impact of technologies of mass production, distribution of music in colonial and post-independence India). GE: Values, Society, and Diversity.

ASIA:2500 Cold War Cultures in Korea3 s.h.

Analysis of Cold War (1945-1989) not only as an era in geopolitics, but also as a historical period marked by specific cultural and artistic forms; focus on Korean peninsula, looking closely at literary and film cultures of both South Korea and North Korea; how global conflict between United States and Soviet centered societies affected politics, culture, and geography of Korea between 1945 and 1989, treating division of Korea as an exemplary case extending from origins of Cold War to the present.

ASIA:2887 Perspectives on Korea3 s.h.

History of Korea from earliest times to present; changing meanings of Korea and Koreans; relevant issues of politics, society, and culture; events that shaped ancient Korean kingdoms, the Choson dynasty (1392-1910), Japanese occupation, and divided Korean peninsula; how present perspectives on Korea have influenced understandings of its past; placement of Korea within a regional and global context to examine Korea's relationship with the world. Same as HIST:2687.

ASIA:3055 Death, Dying, and Beyond in Asian Religions3 s.h.

Survey of cultural and religious approaches to the dying process, post-death rituals, and conceptions about the afterlife in different religions in Asia. Same as RELS:3055.

ASIA:3120 Autobiography in Islamic Literary Cultures3 s.h.

How the self has been constructed in Islamic literary cultures from classical Islamic period to modernity.

ASIA:3219 Chinese Art and Culture3 s.h.

Archaeological discoveries, sculpture, painting, architecture, calligraphy, other arts of Greater China area in historical and cultural contexts of past 5,000 years. Prerequisites: ARTH:1060 or ARTH:2220. Same as ARTH:3220.

ASIA:3220 Chinese Painting I: Pagodas and Palaces3 s.h.

Early Chinese painting from fourth century B.C.E. through 14th century C.E.; figural style, religious art, emergence of landscape, other nonreligious subjects, interconnectedness of painting and calligraphy as fine arts. Same as ARTH:3230.

ASIA:3270 Themes in Asian Art History3 s.h.

Same as ARTH:3270.

ASIA:3550 Islam, Secularity, Modernity3 s.h.

How religiosity and secularity are experienced in the Muslim world today.

ASIA:3655 Zen Buddhism3 s.h.

Same as RELS:3655.

ASIA:3700 Topics in Global Cinema3 s.h.

Identification of new models and methods to investigate cinema's relationship to current global issues beyond traditional scholarly focus in Western Europe and the United States; exploration of an emerging field, moving away from the paradigm of national cinema and bringing together shared theoretical frameworks while acknowledging different historical and cultural contexts. Same as JPNS:3700, TRNS:3700, WLLC:3700.

ASIA:3775 East Meets West: The Western Reception of Eastern Religion3 s.h.

Introduction of religious ideas and forms from India, China, and Japan into Europe and America to late 20th century, from Greeks to New Age. Same as RELS:3575.

ASIA:3890 Comparative Ritual3 s.h.

Practice and theory; rituals from religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Christianity, Indian religions; theories of interpretation. Same as RELS:3572.

ASIA:4166 Topics in Asian History3 s.h.

Same as HIST:4666.

ASIA:4301 Honors Tutorialarr.

ASIA:4506 Senior Honors Thesisarr.

ASIA:4507 Topics in Asian Studiesarr.

Topics vary.

ASIA:4508 Asian Studiesarr.

ASIA:4606 Topics in Asian Cinema3 s.h.

Issues or topics in East or South Asian cinemas. Prerequisites: CINE:1601. Same as CINE:4606.

ASIA:4655 China Since 19273 s.h.

Communist revolution from 1920s to founding of People's Republic of China in 1949; Mao Zedong's radical policies, Cultural Revolution; Deng Xiaoping's economic reforms; China today. Same as HIST:4655.

ASIA:4657 Chinese History from 1600 to 19273 s.h.

Chinese history from the 17th to early 20th century, history of the Qing dynasty (1644-1911); Qing's role in shaping aspects of today's politics in China and the mentality of Chinese people; foundation of Manchu state in early 17th century, Ming-Qing transition in 1644, politics and society during the high Qing era, decline of the empire under foreign invasion and inner rebellions in the 19th century, collapse of the dynasty in 1911. Same as HIST:4650.

ASIA:6483 Second Language Classroom Learning3 s.h.

Synthesis of empirical findings on children's and adults' learning of a second or foreign language; emphasis on theoretical underpinnings of approaches, methods, techniques in language teaching. Same as EDTL:6483, SLA:6506.

ASIA:6501 M.A. Thesisarr.

Offered fall semesters.

ASIA:6502 M.A. Thesisarr.

Offered spring semesters.

ASIA:6520 Seminar: South Asian Religion3 s.h.

Topics in South Asian religions. Same as RELS:6520.

ASIA:6901 Second Language Acquisition Research and Theory3 s.h.

Theories regarding success and failure in acquisition of second or subsequent languages; research, issues. Same as FREN:6901, JPNS:6901, SLA:6901, SPAN:6901.

ASIA:6903 Second Language Acquisition Research and Theory II3 s.h.

Continuation of SLA:6901. Prerequisites: SLA:6901. Same as SLA:6902, SPAN:6902.

ASIA:7606 Readings in Chinese Historyarr.

Same as HIST:7606.

Chinese Courses

High school students and University of Iowa students who would like to learn Chinese but do not plan to use Chinese to satisfy the World Languages requirement of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Program may wish to take the beginning Chinese courses CHIN:1115 and  CHIN:1116 in sequence and may follow them with the second-year courses CHIN:2101 and CHIN:2102. See the course descriptions below.

CHIN:1070 Asian Art and Culture3 s.h.

Art from India, China, and Japan in many media and forms, in their cultural and historical contexts; cultural distinctions of these Asian civilizations as seen through the visual arts; chronology used to highlight historical processes and provide perspectives on continuity and change. GE: Historical Perspectives; Literary, Visual, and Performing Arts. Same as ARTH:1070.

CHIN:1101 Conversational Chinese I1 s.h.

Introduction to modern Chinese, with focus on communication "survival" skills for discussing oneself, family, daily activities, interests, personal preferences, food, shopping, travel, lodging; situational activities and performance.

CHIN:1102 Conversational Chinese II1 s.h.

Continuation of CHIN:1101, with focus on speaking and listening.

CHIN:1111 First-Year Chinese: First Semester5 s.h.

Sound system of Mandarin Chinese, basic sentence patterns; aural understanding, speaking, reading, writing. Offered fall semesters. Requirements: undergraduate standing. GE: World Languages First Level Proficiency.

CHIN:1112 First-Year Chinese: Second Semester5 s.h.

Continuation of CHIN:1111. Offered spring semesters. Prerequisites: CHIN:1111. Requirements: undergraduate standing. GE: World Languages Second Level Proficiency.

CHIN:1115 Beginning Chinese I3 s.h.

Beginning Chinese; offered through UI Confucius Institute; first of a four-course sequence.

CHIN:1116 Beginning Chinese II3 s.h.

Continuation of CHIN:1115; offered through UI Confucius Institute; second of a four-course sequence. Requirements: CHIN:1115 or equivalent as demonstrated in written and oral exams.

CHIN:1504 Asian Humanities: China3 s.h.

Literary and philosophical texts of China in English translation. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity.

CHIN:1702 Chinese Popular Culture3 s.h.

Introduction to popular culture from the People's Republic of China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and the Chinese diaspora; shifting relationships among cultural production, media and technology, and political thought; influences of Japan, Korea, and the West; materials drawn from film, television shows, music, new media, popular literature, comics, magazines, advertising, fashion, art, and material culture; no previous knowledge of Chinese is required.

CHIN:1800 Chinese Character Writing and Calligraphy2 s.h.

Introduction to historical development of Chinese script, Chinese calligraphy theories, representative calligraphers, and writing Chinese script by using a Chinese writing brush. Recommendations: enrollment in a Chinese language course.

CHIN:2101 Second-Year Chinese: First Semester5 s.h.

Continuation of CHIN:1112. Offered fall semesters. Prerequisites: CHIN:1112. Requirements: undergraduate standing. GE: World Languages Second Level Proficiency.

CHIN:2102 Second-Year Chinese: Second Semester5 s.h.

Continuation of CHIN:2101. Offered spring semesters. Prerequisites: CHIN:2101. Requirements: undergraduate standing. GE: World Languages Fourth Level Proficiency.

CHIN:2103 Accelerated Second-Year Chinese: First Semester3 s.h.

Intermediate Chinese. Requirements: grades of C or higher in CHIN:1111 and CHIN:1112, and one summer of Chinese study in China. GE: World Languages First Level Proficiency.

CHIN:2104 Accelerated Second-Year Chinese: Second Semester3 s.h.

Intermediate Chinese. Prerequisites: grade of C or higher in CHIN:2103. GE: World Languages Fourth Level Proficiency.

CHIN:3101 Third-Year Chinese: First Semester3 s.h.

Reading of advanced modern Chinese texts; speaking, writing. Offered fall semesters. Prerequisites: CHIN:2102.

CHIN:3102 Third Year Chinese: Second Semester3 s.h.

Continuation of CHIN:3101. Offered spring semesters. Prerequisites: CHIN:3101.

CHIN:3103 Business Chinese I3 s.h.

Skill development in communicating with Chinese counterparts on a number of domains in business translations; first of a two-course sequence. Prerequisites: CHIN:2102.

CHIN:3104 Business Chinese II3 s.h.

Skill development in communicating with Chinese counterparts on a number of domains in business translations; second of a two-course sequence. Prerequisites: CHIN:3102 or CHIN:3103.

CHIN:3201 Workshop in Chinese Literary Translation3 s.h.

Translation from Chinese to English with emphasis on literary translation; issues in theory and practice of translation; special features of Chinese as a source language for translation. Prerequisites: CHIN:3102. Same as TRNS:3202.

CHIN:3202 Chinese Literature: Prose3 s.h.

Readings in Chinese prose, primarily fiction, from third century B.C. to 1900 A.D., in English translation.

CHIN:3302 Introduction to Chinese Linguistics3 s.h.

Aspects of modern Chinese linguistics, such as Chinese phonology, syntax, pedagogical grammar, history of the language. Taught in English. Same as LING:3302, SLA:3302.

CHIN:3341 Chinese Literature: Poetry3 s.h.

Readings in classical and modern Chinese poetry in English translation. Same as CL:3341.

CHIN:4101 Classical Chinese: First Semester3 s.h.

Late Zhou period; readings from Zhanguoce, Mengzi, Zhuangzi; focus on grammatical analysis, exact translation. Offered fall semesters. Prerequisites: CHIN:2102.

CHIN:4102 Classical Chinese: Second Semester3 s.h.

Continuation of CHIN:4101. Offered spring semesters. Prerequisites: CHIN:4101.

CHIN:4103 Fourth-Year Chinese: First Semester3 s.h.

Proficiency through oral and written discussions of modern texts. Offered fall semesters. Prerequisites: CHIN:3102.

CHIN:4104 Fourth-Year Chinese: Second Semester3 s.h.

Offered spring semesters. Prerequisites: CHIN:4103.

CHIN:4150 Advanced Readings in Chinese3 s.h.

Essays in aspects of contemporary Chinese society to further understanding of Chinese society and to expand reading and writing skills. Taught in Chinese. Prerequisites: CHIN:4103.

CHIN:4203 Modern Chinese Writers3 s.h.

Readings in modern and contemporary Chinese fiction; in English translation. Same as CL:4203.

CHIN:4204 The Literature of Daoism3 s.h.

Texts of philosophical, religious Daoism; Daoism in traditional Chinese political theory, literature, the arts, alchemy and medicine, sexual custom, combat. Taught in English. Same as RELS:4404.

CHIN:4206 Transnational Chinese Cinemas3 s.h.

Films from Mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Chinese diasporic communities, silent era to present; relationship of film to nation-state, cultural interflows, media technologies, ideologies. English subtitles. Same as CINE:4674.

CHIN:4300 Independent Studyarr.

Research, reading, writing, and translation projects for undergraduate students. Prerequisites: CHIN:3102.

CHIN:5024 Teaching Chinese as a Second Language VII: Pedagogical Grammar3 s.h.

Introduction to Chinese grammar system from perspective of teaching Chinese as a foreign language; students teach a unit of Chinese grammar to demonstrate understanding of assigned grammar unit and pedagogical approach involved.

CHIN:5101 Fifth-Year Chinese: First Semester3 s.h.

Improvement of language skills in modern Chinese: listening, speaking, reading, writing; skill development in reading authentic texts related to topics of student interest. Prerequisites: CHIN:4104.

CHIN:5102 Fifth-Year Chinese: Second Semester3 s.h.

Continuation of CHIN:5101. Prerequisites: CHIN:5101.

CHIN:5103 Readings in Chinese Society3 s.h.

Academic texts relating to aspects of Chinese society to develop students' academic reading and writing skills. Requirements: CHIN:5102 for nonnative Chinese student.

CHIN:5105 Literary Chinese I3 s.h.

Readings from literary and historical texts of Han and Wei-Jin periods. Prerequisites: CHIN:4102.

CHIN:5106 Individual Chinese for Advanced Studentsarr.

Research, translation projects. Prerequisites: CHIN:4104.

CHIN:5107 Advanced Classical Chinese3 s.h.

Readings from classical texts of early China period. Prerequisites: CHIN:4102.

CHIN:5201 Seminar in Chinese Fiction3 s.h.

Novels, novelettes; 16th to 18th centuries (Ming and Qing periods). Requirements: ability to read original texts. Same as CL:5201.

CHIN:5202 Seminar in Chinese Literaturearr.

Requirements: two years of modern Chinese and one year of classical Chinese. Same as CL:5202.

CHIN:6401 Teaching Chinese as a Second Language VI3 s.h.

Participation in Chinese second language material development projects under instructor's guidance.

CHIN:7401 Teaching Chinese as a Second Language I3 s.h.

Research, theory on acquisition of Chinese as a non-native language. Same as SLA:7406.

CHIN:7403 Teaching Chinese as a Second Language III3 s.h.

Classroom instructional theories, methodologies, and techniques of teaching Chinese as a second language; teaching practicum.

CHIN:7404 Teaching Chinese as a Second Language IV3 s.h.

Overview of goals, concepts, principles, research, and issues in assessment and testing of Chinese as a second language. Same as SLA:7804.

CHIN:7405 Teaching Chinese as a Second Language V3 s.h.

Qualitative and quantitative research design theories and techniques. Prerequisites: CHIN:7401 and PSQF:4143. Same as SLA:7405.

Japanese Courses

JPNS:1001 First-Year Japanese: First Semester5 s.h.

Modern Japanese. Offered fall semesters. Requirements: undergraduate standing. GE: World Languages First Level Proficiency.

JPNS:1002 First-Year Japanese: Second Semester5 s.h.

Continuation of JPNS:1001. Offered spring semesters. Prerequisites: JPNS:1001. Requirements: undergraduate standing. GE: World Languages Second Level Proficiency.

JPNS:1030 Japanese for Travelers2 s.h.

Basic, practical language and social skills that travelers or visitors need in everyday situations, such as making self introductions, ordering food, asking for directions, and traveling by train; Japanese culture, manners and customs, major cities and tourist attractions; for students with no previous experience of Japanese who plan to travel in Japan or would like a practical introduction to the language and culture.

JPNS:1115 Japanese Religions3 s.h.

Religions of Japan from ancient times to the present day; elite and popular Japanese interpretations of Chinese Buddhist and Daoist traditions; the parallel development of an indigenous kami tradition; contemporary new religious movements; focus on the codification of a variety of religious (and sometimes quasi-religious) paths, including the way of tea, the way of the brush, and the way of the samurai. Same as RELS:1610.

JPNS:1200 Special Topics in Japanese3 s.h.

Topics vary.

JPNS:1506 Asian Humanities: Japan3 s.h.

Introduction to premodern, modern, and contemporary Japanese images, myths, and literature in English translation. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity.

JPNS:2001 Second-Year Japanese: First Semester4-5 s.h.

Continuation of JPNS:1002. Offered fall semesters. Prerequisites: JPNS:1002. Requirements: undergraduate standing. GE: World Languages Second Level Proficiency.

JPNS:2002 Second-Year Japanese: Second Semester4-5 s.h.

Continuation of JPNS:2001. Offered spring semesters. Prerequisites: JPNS:2001. Requirements: undergraduate standing. GE: World Languages Fourth Level Proficiency.

JPNS:2020 Building Kanji Skills1 s.h.

Designed as a supplement for students currently enrolled in or who have already taken second-year Japanese and who have no other no background in languages that use Chinese characters; students develop strategies and skills to learn Kanji more effectively; recommended for students who would like additional instruction and practice with Kanji.

JPNS:2175 Japanese Society and Culture3 s.h.

Cultural anthropology of Japan, including historical tradition, religious ethos, social organization, human ecology, educational and political institutions; emphasis on how these aspects relate to and influence one another. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity. Same as ANTH:2175.

JPNS:2250 Introduction to the Art of Japan3 s.h.

Chronological survey of Japan's visual arts in their historical and cultural contexts from Neolithic age to present; extensive use of slides, films, other visual materials. Same as ARTH:2250.

JPNS:3001 Third-Year Japanese I3 s.h.

Modern Japanese; focus on speaking, listening, reading, writing; materials related to everyday life and civilization in Japan. Offered fall semesters. Prerequisites: JPNS:2002.

JPNS:3002 Third-Year Japanese II3 s.h.

Continuation of JPNS:3001. Offered spring semesters. Prerequisites: JPNS:3001.

JPNS:3020 Intensive Kanji: Intermediate I1 s.h.

Students learn and strengthen their existing knowledge of Kanji; particularly recommended for third-year Japanese students and those who plan to take the Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT) at the N3 level.

JPNS:3107 Classical Japanese: First Semester3 s.h.

Grammar, readings in classical Japanese. Offered fall semesters. Prerequisites: JPNS:3002.

JPNS:3128 Introduction to Japanese Linguistics3 s.h.

Phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics; basic structural features of Japanese language.

JPNS:3135 Postmodern Aesthetics and Japanese Culture3 s.h.

Japanese postmodern trends (from Zen Buddhism to the habits of contemporary otaku consumers); examination of aesthetics including works of literature, film, visual art, and electronic media.

JPNS:3201 Workshop in Japanese Literary Translation3 s.h.

Workshop in translation from Japanese to English, with emphasis on literary translation; issues in theory and practice of translation; special features of Japanese as a source language for translation. Corequisites: JPNS:3001, if not taken as a prerequisite. Same as TRNS:3201.

JPNS:3202 Traditional Japanese Literature in Translation3 s.h.

From seventh century to early modern times. Same as CL:3204.

JPNS:3203 Modern Japanese Fiction in Translation3 s.h.

Nineteenth century to present. Same as CL:3203.

JPNS:3204 Topics in Japanese Literature in Translation3 s.h.

Topics vary.

JPNS:3205 Major Authors in Modern Japanese Literature3 s.h.

Modern Japanese literary works in English translation.

JPNS:3206 Warriors Dreams3 s.h.

Images of the warrior in traditional Japanese literature, from poetry of the eighth century to romances of the 19th century; readings in English. Same as CL:3206.

JPNS:3207 Japan Illuminated: Japanese Literature and Visual Culture3 s.h.

How verbal-visual narratives have been used to teach, entertain, persuade, and rebel across 1,000 years of Japanese culture; students explore a wide variety of artworks and literary texts, as well as the messages they communicate, including illustrated handscrolls of major literary and Buddhist works, “picture lectures” used to advertise pilgrimage in the medieval era, early modern “yellowback” parodies of high art and culture, 20th-century woodblock prints and photography as propaganda, and examples of social commentary in contemporary manga and anime. Taught in English, all texts in English translation.

JPNS:3208 Japanese Film3 s.h.

History of Japanese cinema with particular attention paid to Japanese conventions and innovations that differ from classical Hollywood or European paradigms (benshi silent-film narrators, jidaigeki period films, wartime propaganda, postwar melodrama, avant-garde Japanese New Wave, rise of Japanese documentary, anime); screenings may include works by world-famous directors (Mizoguchi, Ozu, Kurosawa) and later masters (Ichikawa Kon, Suzuki Seijun, Itami Juzo); knowledge of film or Japanese is not necessary; all readings in English, films screened with Japanese subtitles.

JPNS:3210 Japanese Theater3 s.h.

Major forms of Japanese theater and performance including Nō and kyōgen, the bunraku puppet theater, kabuki, shingeki “Western” theater, benshi film narration, butoh modern dance, counterculture and street theater of the 1960s, and Japanese musicals; focus on textual analysis and performance practices; weekly screenings of theatrical performances and student-led staged readings of contemporary performances; all readings in English and screenings have subtitles or accompanying scripts; no knowledge of Japanese required.

JPNS:3260 Japanese Painting3 s.h.

Japanese painting in its historical, cultural contexts; focus on developments of successive eras--religious art; narrative, other literary connections; Zen; decorative traditions; popular arts; Japan and the modern world. Same as ARTH:3260.

JPNS:3401 Language in Japanese Society3 s.h.

Aspects of the Japanese language that reflect culture, social structures of Japan; communication styles and strategies, cross-cultural communication, language in media, metaphors.

JPNS:3402 Japan: Culture and Communication3 s.h.

JPNS:3500 Business Japanese I3 s.h.

Introduction to essential linguistic skills and practical knowledge needed to effectively communicate in Japanese in various professional contexts in socially appropriate manners; business-related expressions, vocabulary, honorifics; development of skills utilizing them in verbal and written modes; sociocultural knowledge associated with Japanese business context, including manners and customs; readings, films, discussions. Corequisites: JPNS:3002, if not taken as a prerequisite.

JPNS:3501 Business Japanese II3 s.h.

Continuation of JPNS:3500; advanced linguistic skills needed to become an effective communicator in various professional settings; develop a deeper understanding of Japanese business culture; improve intercultural communication and problem-solving skills; for students interested in working in Japan or using Japanese at work. Prerequisites: JPNS:3500.

JPNS:3601 Contemporary Japanese Culture3 s.h.

Cultural texts and practices in contemporary Japan: literature, film, television, manga.

JPNS:3660 Japanese Religion and Thought3 s.h.

Same as RELS:3660.

JPNS:3700 Topics in Global Cinema3 s.h.

Identification of new models and methods to investigate cinema's relationship to current global issues beyond traditional scholarly focus in Western Europe and the United States; exploration of an emerging field, moving away from the paradigm of national cinema and bringing together shared theoretical frameworks while acknowledging different historical and cultural contexts. Same as ASIA:3700, TRNS:3700, WLLC:3700.

JPNS:4001 Fourth-Year Japanese I3 s.h.

Modern Japanese; focus on reading, writing, speaking, listening. Offered fall semesters. Prerequisites: JPNS:3002.

JPNS:4002 Fourth-Year Japanese II3 s.h.

Continuation of JPNS:4001. Offered spring semesters. Prerequisites: JPNS:4001.

JPNS:4201 The Tale of Genji3 s.h.

Close reading in English of Murasaki Shikibu's Tale of Genji; tale's literary and social contexts, and later reception. Same as CL:4201.

JPNS:4501 Fifth-Year Japanese I3 s.h.

Modern Japanese; emphasis on communication skills. Offered fall semesters. Prerequisites: JPNS:4002.

JPNS:4502 Fifth Year Japanese II3 s.h.

Continuation of JPNS:4501. Offered spring semesters. Prerequisites: JPNS:4501.

JPNS:4610 Japan - Age of the Samurai3 s.h.

Society, culture, and politics of feudal Japan; social class, gender, norms, and political and economic developments explored through cinema and literature. Same as HIST:4610.

JPNS:4615 Modern Japan3 s.h.

Political, social, and cultural developments of Japanese feudalism; feature films, fiction. Same as HIST:4615.

JPNS:4620 Japan-US Relations3 s.h.

Political, social, economic, and cultural developments in Japan mid-19th to late-20th century. Same as HIST:4620.

JPNS:5301 Japanese Linguistics3 s.h.

Japanese language as linguistic system; basic linguistic terminology; sound systems, grammar, meanings, usages.

JPNS:5401 Japanese as a Foreign Language: Practical Applications3 s.h.

Instructional methodology, curriculum, and material design; hands-on experience. Same as SLA:5441.

JPNS:5901 Practicum in Teaching Japanese as a Foreign Language1-3 s.h.

Teaching apprenticeship guided and supervised by a faculty member skilled in University curriculum and instruction.

JPNS:5902 Individual Japanese for Advanced Studentsarr.

JPNS:6403 Special Topics in Japanese Linguistics3 s.h.

Topics in applied linguistics and language pedagogy related to Japanese language. Same as SLA:6403.

JPNS:6901 Second Language Acquisition Research and Theory3 s.h.

Theories regarding success and failure in acquisition of second or subsequent languages; research, issues. Same as ASIA:6901, FREN:6901, SLA:6901, SPAN:6901.

JPNS:7101 Readings in Modern Japanese3 s.h.

Readings in modern Japanese.

JPNS:7201 Seminar in Japanese Literature3 s.h.

Requirements: three years of Japanese.

JPNS:7630 Readings: Japanese Historyarr.

Same as HIST:7630.

Korean Courses

KORE:1051 Korean for Travel and Business2 s.h.

Introduction to basic communication skills and Korean culture; Korean alphabet (Hangeul), survival Korean expressions, cultural etiquette and norms; speaking, comprehension, reading, and writing in basic Korean; Korean business culture; classroom activities and assignments based on authentic material.

KORE:1052 Korean for Travel and Business: Second Semester2 s.h.

Continuation of ASIA:1051; introduction to basic communication skills and Korean culture which are essential for communicating with Korean people while traveling or doing business; basic Korean expressions, cultural etiquette, and norms; speaking, comprehension, reading, and writing in basic Korean; Korean business culture; classroom activities and homework assignments based on authentic material. Requirements: some familiarity with Korean is needed, but completion of specific course work in Korean is not required.

KORE:1101 First-Year Korean: First Semester4 s.h.

Modern Korean; speaking, listening, reading, writing. Offered fall semesters. GE: World Languages First Level Proficiency.

KORE:1102 First-Year Korean: Second Semester4 s.h.

Continuation of KORE:1101. Offered spring semesters. Prerequisites: KORE:1101. GE: World Languages Second Level Proficiency.

KORE:1135 Korean Language in Culture and Society3 s.h.

Introduction to various sociolinguistic phenomena in Korean society; general linguistic characteristics of Korean; Confucianism and honorifics; language changes in North and South Koreas; gender differences and generation differences; Korean contacts with English, Chinese, Japanese, others. Taught in English.

KORE:1500 Asian Humanities: Korea3 s.h.

Introduction to most representative cultural heritages in Korean humanities tradition throughout 4,500 years of Korean history; English translations of famous works in Korean traditional literature, performing and visual arts, philosophy; understanding the essence of traditional Korean culture through exposure to various aspects of Korean humanities; how Korean traditional culture is reflected in contemporary pop culture; readings and discussions taught in English, video materials with English subtitles.

KORE:2101 Second-Year Korean: First Semester4 s.h.

Continuation of KORE:1102; conversation and readings in intermediate Korean language; Korean culture. Prerequisites: KORE:1102. GE: World Languages Second Level Proficiency.

KORE:2102 Second-Year Korean: Second Semester4 s.h.

Continuation of KORE:2101. Prerequisites: KORE:2101. GE: World Languages Fourth Level Proficiency.

KORE:3101 Third-Year Korean: First Semester3 s.h.

Continuation of KORE:2102; advanced intermediate Korean—conversation and grammar skills beyond basic intermediate level; vocabulary expansion with increasingly complex, abstract concepts; how to advance one's opinion and discuss thoughts, ideas. Prerequisites: KORE:2102.

KORE:3102 Third-Year Korean: Second Semester3 s.h.

Continuation of KORE:3101; conversation and grammar skills beyond basic intermediate level; writing skills for formal occasions; advanced discussion skills—how to advance one's opinion and share thoughts and ideas; traditional and modern Korean culture. Prerequisites: KORE:3101.

KORE:4000 Fourth Year Korean: First Semester3 s.h.

Continuation of KORE:3102; development of intermediate high to advanced-level Korean; enlarging vocabulary, exploring Korean sentence structures, reading various types of texts, listening to authentic Korean materials; Korean society and culture; content-based learning methodology. Prerequisites: KORE:3102.

KORE:4001 Fourth Year Korean: Second Semester3 s.h.

Continuation of KORE:4000; development of intermediate high- to advanced-level Korean speaking ability; enlarging vocabulary, exploring Korean sentence structures, reading various types of texts, and listening to authentic Korean materials; Korean society and culture; materials provided to prepare for Korean standardized tests; content-based learning methodology. Prerequisites: KORE:3102.

KORE:4050 Two Koreas: Political Economy or Regional Rivalry3 s.h.

Introduction to the Korean peninsula; focus on nature of North and South Korean regional rivalry and its global impacts; theoretical and historical explanations; various security issues including North Korean nuclear threat, military alliances, and reunification prospects; economic issues including differential growth paths, South Korea's rapid growth, and recent economic woes in both Koreas. Same as POLI:4050.

KORE:4151 Selected Readings in Korean I3 s.h.

Korean literary works and various readings related to Korean history, culture, and society; expansion of Korean literacy and cultural knowledge through readings; advanced Korean texts.

KORE:4152 Selected Readings in Korean II3 s.h.

Reading various genres of more advanced texts than those covered in KORE:4150; short stories, poetry, and essays familiar with educated Korean people; texts related to history and current events (e.g., articles from newspapers or magazines); texts written in hangul (Korean characters) and hanja (Chinese characters); Korean literature, history, and culture. Prerequisites: KORE:3102.

KORE:5102 Individual Korean for Advanced Studentsarr.

Korea's modern/traditional culture, history, and current social issues; reading, translating authentic articles. Prerequisites: KORE:3102.

Slavic Courses

SLAV:1000 First-Year Seminar1 s.h.

Cultural, literary, architectural, and historical beauty of Prague, the capital of the Czech Republic. Requirements: first- or second-semester standing.

SLAV:1030 Conversational Russian I3 s.h.

Basic elements of Russian for travel and business; for adult learners.

SLAV:1031 Conversational Russian II3 s.h.

Continuation of SLAV:1030; basic elements of Russian for travel or business; for adult learners.

SLAV:1050 Russian for Travelers and Business People2 s.h.

How Russian culture continues to shape current geopolitical and sporting events (e.g., World Cup Soccer 2018); emphasis on learning basic survival Russian phrases, cultural etiquette and norms. Taught in English.

SLAV:1111 First-Year Russian I5 s.h.

Basic language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing Russian; fundamentals of Russian grammar. GE: World Languages First Level Proficiency.

SLAV:1112 First-Year Russian II5 s.h.

Continuation of SLAV:1111. Requirements: SLAV:1111. GE: World Languages Second Level Proficiency.

SLAV:1131 Introduction to Russian Culture3 s.h.

Development of cultural history in Russia from middle ages to present; painting, music architecture, literature viewed against their political, historical, and social settings. Taught in English. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity.

SLAV:1132 Russia Today3 s.h.

Contemporary Russia, with focus on prevailing social, political, economic, ethnic, environmental conditions; attention to historical evolution of problems, current factors; what these factors might portend for the future. Taught in English. GE: International and Global Issues; Values, Society, and Diversity.

SLAV:1211 Conversational Czech I3 s.h.

Development of basic reading and writing skills, ability to understand and speak everyday Czech; history and culture of Czech-speaking countries through discussions, readings, and videos. GE: World Languages First Level Proficiency.

SLAV:1212 Conversational Czech II3 s.h.

Continuation of SLAV:1211; development of basic reading and writing skills, ability to understand and speak everyday Czech; history and culture of Czech-speaking countries through discussions, readings, and videos. Requirements: SLAV:1211. GE: World Languages Second Level Proficiency.

SLAV:1450 Diversities of Eastern Europe: Culture, Art, and Politics3 s.h.

Exploration of major cultural and social changes in Central Europe since the 1950s; very similar, yet different experiences of four nations with a communist takeover, including crushed attempts to reform and humanize socialism and their final reach for freedom and democracy in 1989; current cultural and social situations of each country as they took advantage of newly available opportunities.

SLAV:1500 Ukraine, a Country at the Crossroads: An Interdisciplinary Seminar on Ukrainian History and Culture3 s.h.

Cultural specificity of Ukraine as a large multicultural European country; vital background information for analysis of present-day political events; strategic location between East and West; centuries-long history and culture; all readings in English, no knowledge of Russian or Ukrainian required. Same as CL:1500.

SLAV:1531 Slavic Folklore3 s.h.

Introduction to culture, history, and art of eastern European peoples; pagan, dualistic, and animistic beliefs and their coexistence with Christian faith in eastern Europe. GE: Historical Perspectives; Values, Society, and Diversity.

SLAV:1532 Religion and Culture of Slavs3 s.h.

Early and medieval Slavic history, with focus on Russian and Czech art, literature, and religion from 10th through 17th century. GE: Historical Perspectives; Values, Society, and Diversity.

SLAV:1600 The Cult of Power in Russian History3 s.h.

Characteristic patterns in cultures associated with some of history's well known authoritarian figures: Ghengis Khan, Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, Lenin, Stalin, and, most recently, Putin; content divided chronologically into six sections—Russia's Tatar-Mongol sociocultural heritage, Ivan the Terrible and imperial expansion and special police, Peter the Great and forced Westernization, Lenin and the "dictatorship of the proletariat", Stalin's control of the arts and cinema, and state power and the age of information technology; readings in English.

SLAV:2100 Secrets of Russian Mentality3 s.h.

Deeper insight of Russian mentality through philosophical, historical, cultural, and practical developments that have shaped Russian behavior and thought.

SLAV:2111 Second-Year Russian I4 s.h.

Transition to upper-level study through oral practice, grammar exercises, tapes, videos, readings from the Russian press. Requirements: SLAV:1112. GE: World Languages Second Level Proficiency.

SLAV:2112 Second-Year Russian II4 s.h.

Continuation of SLAV:2111. Requirements: SLAV:2111. GE: World Languages Fourth Level Proficiency.

SLAV:2122 Cult Films of the Last Soviet Generation3 s.h.

Political and cultural circumstance of one of the world's most volatile and powerful regions; how life within what was considered an "Evil Empire" from 1960s to 1980s was far from primitive; how creative intelligentsia continued producing and enjoying excellent motion pictures despite multiple bans and regulations; implications for contemporary life; wider understanding of Russian aesthetics.

SLAV:2131 Women in Russian Society3 s.h.

Historical developments that have shaped women's role in contemporary Russian society; readings in cultural history, political science, autobiographical and fictional literature, contemporary film. Taught in English.

SLAV:2211 Conversational Czech III3 s.h.

Continuation of SLAV:1212; development of reading and writing skills, ability to understand and speak everyday Czech; history and culture of Czech-speaking countries through discussions, readings, and videos. Requirements: SLAV:1212. GE: World Languages Second Level Proficiency.

SLAV:2212 Conversational Czech IV3 s.h.

Continuation of SLAV:2211; development of reading and writing skills, ability to understand and speak everyday Czech; history and culture of Czech-speaking countries through discussions, readings, and videos. Requirements: SLAV:2211. GE: World Languages Fourth Level Proficiency.

SLAV:2232 Romani (Gypsy) Cultures of Eastern Europe3 s.h.

Aspects of culture shared by most Roma (Gypsies) around the world; samples of folklore from Europe; impact of Roma on European literature, music, and culture; readings in English; no previous knowledge of Russian or Romani required. Same as CL:2700.

SLAV:2531 Topics in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studiesarr.

Same as CL:2531.

SLAV:2600 Issues in Russian Identity: Nationalism3 s.h.

Development of the Russian national identity in the works of three 19th-century Russian authors: Alexander Pushkin, Leo Tolstoy and Fyodor Dostoevsky; how major historical events such as Russia's wars with Poland, Sweden, France, England, and Turkey are portrayed in Pushkin's Boris Godunov and Poltava, Tolstoy's War and Peace and Sevastopol Sketches; how Western Europe is viewed in Dostoevsky's Winter Notes on Summer Impressions, Notes From Underground, and The Idiot. Prerequisites: RHET:1030. Requirements: ENGL:1200.

SLAV:3082 Youth Subcultures After Socialism3-4 s.h.

Examination of youth subculture (i.e., distinct style and identity, beliefs, value system, fashion and favorite music) on the territory of post-communist Europe and its relations with the mainstream culture; how young people of Russia express their individuality after years of dullness and monotony. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity.

SLAV:3100 West and East: Women in the Slavic World3 s.h.

Roles of women in two Slavic countries--Islamic Republic of Dagestan in Russia, and the Czech Republic--using approaches from the social sciences and humanities; Christian/Catholic traditions in the western Slavic country (i.e., Czechoslovakia/Czech Republic) and Islamic influences in eastern parts of Russia; analysis of women's egalitarian roles in socialist societies of 1980s, the impact of the major political, economic, and social transitions on women’s lives in 1990s.

SLAV:3111 Third-Year Russian I4 s.h.

Advanced Russian grammar, reading, conversation, and written skills through oral reports, compositions, conversation. Requirements: SLAV:2112.

SLAV:3112 Third-Year Russian II4 s.h.

Advanced Russian grammar, reading, conversation, and written skills through oral reports, compositions, conversation. Requirements: SLAV:3111.

SLAV:3113 Beginning Composition and Conversation I4 s.h.

Russian oral and aural skills developed through idiomatic usage, stylistics, phonetics, intonation, grammar review; supplemented by short stories, newspaper texts. Taught in Russian. Requirements: SLAV:1112.

SLAV:3114 Beginning Composition and Conversation II4 s.h.

Russian oral and aural skills developed through idiomatic usage, stylistics, phonetics, intonation, grammar review; supplemented by short stories, conversation handbooks, current periodicals. Taught in Russian. Requirements: SLAV:2112.

SLAV:3115 Russian for Heritage Learners3 s.h.

Linguistic problems (grammar and vocabulary), communicative problems (understanding of written and oral advanced Russian speech), cultural problems (similarities and differences between cultures); for Russian heritage speakers.

SLAV:3116 Russian for Heritage Learners II3 s.h.

Continuation of SLAV:3115.

SLAV:3122 Tolstoy and Dostoevsky3-4 s.h.

Tolstoy's War and Peace and Anna Karenina; Dostoevsky's Crime and PunishmentThe Demons, and short stories. Taught in English. Same as CL:3122.

SLAV:3124 Invitation to Nabokov3-4 s.h.

Nabokov's works and his writings on Russian literature.

SLAV:3131 Health Care and Health Reforms in Russia3 s.h.

Societal changes and their continuing effect on the Russian health care system since 1991; guest lectures from public health, nursing, medicine, cultural anthropology. Same as GHS:3131.

SLAV:3145 Third-Year Czech I4 s.h.

Advanced knowledge of Czech grammar; reading, comprehension, conversation, and writing skills; varied techniques and activities for proficiency in Czech; conversation in small groups, presentation of oral reports, written compositions, group projects; articles from the press, contemporary Czech short stories, videos of contemporary Czech cultural scene. Requirements: SLAV:2212.

SLAV:3146 Third-Year Czech II4 s.h.

Continuation of SLAV:3145; advanced knowledge of Czech grammar and basic syntax structures of Czech sentences; reading, aural comprehension, conversation, writing skills; short stories from Czech Literature, Internet press articles, short compositions; videos of contemporary Czech cultural scene. Requirements: SLAV:3145.

SLAV:3202 Russian Literature in Translation 1860-19173 s.h.

Survey of major works, figures, and trends of 19th‑ and early 20th‑century Russian literature; age of the Russian novel; works of Turgenev (Fathers and Sons), Tolstoy (Confession), Dostoevsky (The IdiotThe Brothers Karamazov), and Chekhov (plays). Same as CL:3302.

SLAV:3221 Twentieth-Century Czech Authors3 s.h.

Twentieth-century prose literature of Czechoslovakia; philosophical works of Capek, Hrabal, Kundera, Klima, Havel. Taught in English. Same as CL:3221.

SLAV:3990 Special Readingsarr.

Russian-language materials determined by student and instructor. Requirements: 16 s.h. of Russian language instruction.

SLAV:4111 Fourth-Year Russian I4 s.h.

Perfecting spoken Russian and aural comprehension of native speech. Taught in Russian. Requirements: SLAV:3112 or three years of college-level Russian.

SLAV:4112 Fourth-Year Russian II4 s.h.

Perfecting spoken Russian and aural comprehension of native speech. Taught in Russian. Requirements: SLAV:4111 or three years of college-level Russian.

SLAV:4480 Literature and Translation3 s.h.

Translation in the broadest sense; originality, authority, authorship, accuracy, ownership, audience; issues problematizing differences between medium and message. Same as TRNS:4480.

SLAV:4990 Independent Researcharr.

Directed study.

SLAV:4995 Honorsarr.

Requirements: consent of program coordinator.

SLAV:5220 Seminar: Russian Linguistics3 s.h.

Topics may include Russian morphosyntax, colloquial Russian, Russian pragmatics, Slavic gender linguistics.

South Asian Studies Courses

SOAS:1502 Asian Humanities: India3 s.h.

Introduction to four thousand years of South Asian civilization, through popular stories. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity. Same as RELS:1502.

SOAS:1550 Sex, Music, and Pop Culture in India3 s.h.

Exploration of debates and conflicts around gender and sexuality in Indian and South Asian popular culture, particularly music; shifting representations of gender relations, sexuality, gender/sexual identities in Indian music; focus on postcolonial period; how folk music, film songs, and classical music (among other genres) have dealt with issues such as changing conceptions of womanhood or masculinity, "queer" or gender/sexually variant communities and identities; how popular culture has negotiated questions of gender and sexuality in relation to nationhood, globalization, and cultural identity.

SOAS:2101 First-Year Hindi-Urdu: First Semester5 s.h.

Reading, writing, speaking. Offered fall semesters of odd years. GE: World Languages First Level Proficiency.

SOAS:2102 First-Year Hindi-Urdu: Second Semester5 s.h.

Continuation of SOAS:2101. Offered spring semesters of even years. Prerequisites: SOAS:2101. Requirements: undergraduate standing. GE: World Languages Second Level Proficiency.

SOAS:2901 First-Year Sanskrit: First Semester4 s.h.

Grammar, basic vocabulary; elementary readings. Offered fall semesters of even years. Requirements: undergraduate standing. GE: World Languages First Level Proficiency. Same as CLSA:2901.

SOAS:2902 First-Year Sanskrit: Second Semester4 s.h.

Readings in epic and story literature. Offered spring semesters of odd years. Requirements: undergraduate standing. GE: World Languages Second Level Proficiency. Same as CLSA:2902.

SOAS:3101 Second-Year Hindi-Urdu: First Semester4 s.h.

Conversation, reading of folktales and modern short stories. Offered fall semesters of even years. Prerequisites: SOAS:2102. GE: World Languages Second Level Proficiency.

SOAS:3102 Second-Year Hindi-Urdu: Second Semester4 s.h.

Continuation of SOAS:3101. Offered spring semesters of odd years. Prerequisites: SOAS:3101. Requirements: undergraduate standing. GE: World Languages Fourth Level Proficiency.

SOAS:3448 The Allure of Krishna: Sacred Sexuality in Indian Culture3 s.h.

For thousands of years, Krishna, the dark-skinned flute-player, has been central to the religious experience of many Hindus; his diverse roles as mischievous divine child, sensual teenage cowherd, and adult statesman, warrior, and philosopher celebrated in poetry and prose, painting and sculpture, music, dance, drama, film, and television; exploration of multiple facets of Krishna's character through literary and visual sources, performances; focus on Indian interpretations of erotic content prominent in his story and to the figure of Radha, Krishna's mistress and beloved. Same as RELS:3448.

SOAS:3500 Queerness in South Asian Literature and Cinema3 s.h.

Debates and conflicts around gender or sexual variance in South Asian cultural spheres; shifting representations of queerness—a broad label for non-normative gender/sexual practices or identities—in literature and films from India and neighboring regions; diverse constructions of gender/sexuality in precolonial India; focus on postcolonial period when regulation of deviant gender/sexuality became tied to colonial administration and emerging national identity; how cultural representations constructed normative or deviant genders/sexualities in relation to class, caste, and nationhood.

SOAS:3901 Second-Year Sanskrit: First Semester3 s.h.

Readings in epic and puranic texts. Offered fall semesters of odd years. Requirements: undergraduate standing. GE: World Languages Second Level Proficiency. Same as CLSA:3901.

SOAS:3902 Second-Year Sanskrit: Second Semester3 s.h.

The Bhagavadgita and related religious/philosophical texts. Offered spring semesters of even years. Requirements: undergraduate standing. GE: World Languages Fourth Level Proficiency. Same as CLSA:3902.

SOAS:3920 Enlightenment: Cross-Cultural Experiments in Religious Realization3 s.h.

Enlightenment as one of the most important ideas that feeds contemporary religious and spiritual imagination; exploration of this concept in contemporary religious and spiritual discourse. Same as RELS:3582.

SOAS:4101 Third-Year Hindi-Urdu: First Semester3 s.h.

Advanced level Hindi texts; speaking, writing. Offered fall semesters. Prerequisites: SOAS:3102.

SOAS:4102 Third-Year Hindi-Urdu: Second Semester3 s.h.

Continuation of SOAS:4101. Offered spring semesters. Prerequisites: SOAS:4101.

SOAS:4103 Individual Hindi for Advanced Studentsarr.

Readings in medieval and modern Hindi.

SOAS:4201 Third-Year Sanskrit: First Semester3 s.h.

Readings in philosophical and literary Sanskrit. Offered fall semesters.

SOAS:4202 Third-Year Sanskrit: Second Semester3 s.h.

Continuation of SOAS:4201. Offered spring semesters.

SOAS:4802 South Asian Research Seminararr.

Faculty and student research.

SOAS:5201 Individual Sanskrit for Advanced Studentsarr.

Research, translation projects. Requirements: fourth-year proficiency.