Undergraduate major: elementary education
Undergraduate minors: educational psychology; human relations
Graduate degrees: M.A.; M.A.T.; M.S.; Ed.S.; Ph.D.
Graduate certificates: multicultural education and culturally competent practice; online teaching; teaching English as a foreign language
Website: https://education.uiowa.edu/

The nation's first university-level professorial chair in education was established at the University of Iowa in 1872. The department became the School of Education in 1907; and the College of Education, structured largely as it is today, was founded in 1913. Since then, the college's growth has mirrored the growth of the University.

Over the years, College of Education faculty members have been leaders in a variety of educational fields. Particularly noteworthy have been their contributions in the fields of educational testing and measurement. These contributions helped lay the foundation for today's testing and measurement industry, making Iowa City one of the best-known centers for this educational specialty.

The college has four departments: Educational Policy and Leadership Studies, Psychological and Quantitative Foundations, Rehabilitation and Counselor Education, and Teaching and Learning.

Faculty

All tenure-track faculty members hold earned doctorates in their teaching fields, and many have had teaching or administrative experience in the public schools. Several hold joint appointments in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

Undergraduate Programs of Study

Major

The College of Education offers the undergraduate major in elementary education for students earning a Bachelor of Arts degree. See the Department of Teaching and Learning for details about the major.

Minors

The College of Education offers two undergraduate minors for students who wish to be better informed about education: one in educational psychology and one in human relations. The minors may help support students' future career objectives and benefit students in their roles as parents, taxpayers, or future members of local boards of education. View the Minor in Educational Psychology (Psychological and Quantitative Foundations) and the Minor in Human Relations (Rehabilitation and Counselor Education) to learn more.

Honors in Education

The College of Education Honors Opportunity Program is open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have maintained a g.p.a. of at least 3.50. Students with lower grade-point averages who have demonstrated research potential also may be accepted, based on the recommendations of faculty and/or staff members and the education honors advisor. Honors Opportunity Program students must take EHOP:4100 Honors Seminar in Education, EHOP:4101 Senior Honors Project, and complete five additional honors experiences. Successful completion of the program results in recognition of the student as a College of Education honors graduate. The Honors Opportunity Program is housed in and administered by the Belin-Blank Center.

Graduate Programs of Study

Graduate study in the College of Education is guided by the policies of the Graduate College, with additional requirements set by the College of Education's faculty. Graduate students in education enroll in the Graduate College and receive their degrees from that college. See the Manual of Rules and Regulations of the Graduate College.

Degree Programs Offered

The College of Education offers the following graduate degrees and programs.

Department of Educational Policy and Leadership Studies

M.A., Ed.S., and Ph.D. in educational policy and leadership studies; the following programs are available:

  • Educational leadership (offered in the M.A., Ed.S., and Ph.D.)
  • Higher education and student affairs (offered in the M.A., Ed.S., and Ph.D.)
  • School curriculum and assessment policy (offered in the Ed.S.)
  • Schools, culture, and society (offered in the M.A. and Ph.D.)

Department of Psychological and Quantitative Foundations

M.A., Ed.S., and Ph.D. in psychological and quantitative foundations; the following programs are available:

  • Counseling psychology (offered in the M.A.—Hong Kong and Ph.D.)
  • Educational measurement and statistics (offered in the M.A. and Ph.D.)
  • Educational psychology (offered in the Ph.D.)
  • Learning sciences (offered in the M.A.)
  • School psychology (offered in the Ed.S. and Ph.D.)

Department of Rehabilitation and Counselor Education

M.A. and Ph.D. in rehabilitation and counselor education; the following programs are available:

  • Counselor education and supervision (offered in the Ph.D.)
  • Couple and family therapy (offered in the Ph.D.)
  • Rehabilitation and mental health counseling (offered in the M.A.)
  • School counseling (offered in the M.A.)

Department of Teaching and Learning

M.A., M.A.T., M.S., and Ph.D. in teaching and learning; the following programs are available:

  • Art education (offered in the M.A.)
  • Developmental reading (offered in the M.A.)
  • English education (offered in the M.A. and M.A.T.)
  • Foreign language and English as a Second Language (ESL) Education (offered in the M.A., M.A.T., and Ph.D.)
  • Language, literacy, and culture (offered in the Ph.D.)
  • Mathematics education (offered in the M.A., M.A.T., and Ph.D.)
  • Science education (offered in the M.S., M.A.T., and Ph.D.)
  • Social studies education (offered in the M.A. and Ph.D.)
  • Special education (offered in the M.A. and Ph.D.)
  • STEM education (offered in the M.S.)
  • Teaching, leadership and cultural competency (offered in the M.A.)

Master of Arts

The College of Education offers a Master of Arts. Some of the college's M.A. programs are offered with thesis as well as without thesis. Nonthesis programs usually provide more specialized course work than do thesis programs. Although a nonthesis program is not necessarily terminal, students who expect to continue their studies in a doctoral program are urged to select a thesis program in order to gain more experience in research procedures. Students who complete a nonthesis M.A. and are admitted to a Ph.D. program may be asked to submit evidence of writing and research skills to their advisor or department during the early part of their doctoral program. For information about programs that offer a thesis option, see the program descriptions under "Graduate Programs of Study" in College of Education department sections of the Catalog.

Course work completed more than 10 years before the session in which the degree is to be conferred must be evaluated to determine how much credit may be accepted toward the degree requirements. Students must earn at least 24 s.h. in University of Iowa courses after formal admission to a master's degree.

Master of Arts in Teaching

The M.A.T. program is designed for academically superior liberal arts and sciences graduates who completed few or no professional education courses in their undergraduate programs. It is a nonthesis program with requirements that range from 45 s.h. to 67 s.h. of credit. See the M.A.T. in Teaching and Learning in the Catalog.

The program leads to a master's degree and licensure as a secondary teacher in the fields of English, foreign languages, mathematics, and science education. Admission to the program requires a g.p.a. of at least 3.00 in undergraduate course work. The program includes 18 s.h. of graduate course work in the student's teaching field. Students must complete a minimum of 20 s.h. of graduate work in education to satisfy licensure requirements.

A Master of Arts program with a secondary education major in social studies leads to initial teacher licensure. See "Program B Requirements" under Social Studies Education in the M.A. in Teaching and Learning section of the Catalog.

Joint B.A./M.A.T. with Science Education Subprogram

Bachelor of Arts students interested in pursuing a graduate degree in teaching may apply to the joint Bachelor of Arts/Master of Arts in Teaching program offered by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the College of Education. Designed for undergraduate students majoring in biology, chemistry, environmental sciences, mathematics, or physics, the joint program enables students to earn a B.A. and M.A.T. in five years by beginning to earn graduate credit during their fourth year of undergraduate study and by counting up to 18 s.h. of qualifying credit toward both degrees. For more information, see "Joint B.A./M.A.T. with Science Education Subprogram" under Science Education in the Master of Arts in Teaching section of the Catalog. Interested students should consult an advisor.

Master of Science

The College of Education offers a Master of Science in teaching and learning without thesis. The degree requirements are similar to those for a Master of Arts.

Specialist in Education

The Ed.S. is granted upon completion of a prescribed two-year postbaccalaureate program designed for students preparing for professional work in fields such as administration and supervision, and special services. Of the minimum 60 s.h. required for the degree, 28 s.h. must be in the specialization area; the rest may be earned in cognate fields, supervised experience, research, and elective courses. The research must culminate in a written report.

Other requirements for the Ed.S. are the same as for the master's degree, except that an Ed.S. requires students to complete 30 s.h. of resident work on campus after admission to the program. Course work completed 10 years before the final examination must be evaluated to determine the amount of credit that may be accepted toward program requirements.

Not all programs offer an Ed.S. degree. For a list of programs and degrees offered, see "Graduate Programs of Study" above.

Doctor of Philosophy

The Ph.D. is the most advanced academic degree. It is conferred upon students who have demonstrated superior scholarship and mastery of research skills in course work as well as in the preparation and defense of a dissertation. Ph.D. students must complete at least 39 s.h. while registered in the University of Iowa Graduate College and after formal program admission.

Certificates

The Certificate in College Teaching requires 12 s.h. of graduate credit. The certificate program is open to all University of Iowa students working toward a Ph.D. or other terminal graduate degree. The certificate program complements discipline-oriented graduate programs and prepares students for careers in postsecondary education. It requires course work, supervised teaching experience, and preparation of a teaching portfolio. To learn more or to apply, see Certificate in College Teaching in the Catalog (Graduate College).

The Certificate in Online Teaching requires 12 s.h. of graduate credit and is offered completely online. The certificate program is open to students enrolled in University of Iowa graduate degree programs and to individuals who are enrolled in the Graduate College as nondegree students. The certificate program develops students' skills in using technology to solve instructional problems associated with distance and time. The certificate's online format uses the techniques and approaches that the program teaches. To learn more or apply, see Certificate in Online Teaching in the Catalog.

The Certificate in Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL) requires 12 s.h. of graduate credit and is offered completely online. The TEFL certificate is designed for students who are interested in English language teaching and administration outside of the United States in primary and secondary school settings (K-12). To learn more or to apply, see Certificate in Teaching English as a Foreign Language in the Catalog.

Professional Improvement

Students who are interested in taking courses as nondegree students should apply for nondegree status to the Graduate College. They can then be admitted by a department on a nondegree basis by contacting the department. Students must be admitted to a department in order to complete a program objective such as teacher licensure.

Extramural Education

Through the Division of Continuing Education, selected College of Education courses are offered at off-campus sites and hours outside the traditional schedule. If taken after formal admission to a specific program, some of these courses may be applied to meet residency requirements for degrees. Students who plan to complete a degree program should apply for admission to the Graduate College and satisfy all application requirements for the degree program they wish to enter.

Special regulations govern such course work. Students should obtain prior approval from their program advisor before registering in extramural courses. Students not regularly admitted to the University of Iowa also may register in extramural courses, but credit earned before admission does not count toward residency requirements.

Teacher Education Programs (TEP) and Student Teaching

The College of Education offers teacher preparation programs in elementary education and in secondary education for students earning bachelor's degrees. It offers the major in elementary education with a Teacher Education Program (TEP) for students earning a Bachelor of Arts. It offers a secondary education TEP for students earning bachelor's degrees with certain majors from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The college also provides a number of specialized elementary and secondary teaching endorsement programs.

Graduate and postbaccalaureate students also may complete a Teacher Education Program; see "Graduate and Postbaccalaureate Admission to TEPs" below and the Teaching and Learning section of the Catalog.

Preparation for special education teaching is offered primarily at the graduate level. In addition, an instructional strategist program is available as an added endorsement for undergraduate students admitted to an elementary education program.

Undergraduate students admitted to a Teacher Education Program must complete all requirements for graduation from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, including the General Education Program. They must satisfy General Education's Quantitative or Formal Reasoning requirement with a college-level mathematics course.

The Office of Student Services provides information on Teacher Education Programs; offers assistance with admission, student field experiences, and teacher licensure/certification; and serves as a liaison with other University units and external agencies. For more information, visit the office's website.

Undergraduate Admission to TEPs

Undergraduate applicants to the University of Iowa who wish to become teachers may indicate their interest in the elementary education major or a secondary-level Teacher Education Program on their application for admission. Application materials for Teacher Education Programs are available from the Office of Student Services or on the office's website.

Acceptance to a Teacher Education Program is prerequisite to registration for most College of Education undergraduate courses.

Application Deadlines

Students must be admitted to the Teacher Education Program in order to register for certain courses, to participate in field experiences/practicums, and to student teach. The priority admission deadline for fall semester is March 1, with applications accepted on a rolling basis until July 1. The priority admission deadline for spring semester is October 1, with applications accepted on a rolling basis until December 1. The ideal time to apply is by the priority deadline, so that students who are admitted to the program can be cleared for advising and registration in a timely manner. Applications are only considered by the faculty when all requirements (including test score minimums) are complete. Faculty members in each program area review and select applicants to be admitted to their program. Some program areas may reach capacity for acceptance before the final deadlines. Applicants are notified of admission decisions by email following faculty review.

General Requirements

Admission to Teacher Education Programs is competitive. Admission requirements may vary by program area. In order to be considered for admission to a Teacher Education Program, an undergraduate student must satisfy the following requirements: admission to the University of Iowa; a minimum amount of credit for college-level work; a minimum grade-point average; minimum scores on a preadmissions test; and a preadmission volunteer field experience in a regular K-12 classroom setting. There may be additional requirements. Teacher Education Program application materials and current minimum application requirements are available on the Office of Student Services website.

Teacher Education Program admission is selective and is based on a faculty review of all application components. Meeting the minimum criteria does not ensure program admission. Selection is determined by academic achievement as reflected in grade-point average and test scores, aptitude as reflected by recommendations and personal statements, and the ability of the given program area to provide quality instruction and clinical and field experiences.

Direct Admissions Policy

The College of Education offers direct admission into the elementary Teacher Education Program. First-year students who present an ACT composite score of 27 or higher and a final high school g.p.a. of at least 3.80 are eligible for the direct admission track into the elementary Teacher Education Program. Students in this track must submit qualifying Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educators Tests (Core) scores and a qualifying 10-hour preadmission school field experience verification form by a selected deadline within their first year at the University of Iowa in order to validate the  admission. The faculty and administration of the elementary Teacher Education Program reserve the right to cap enrollment in the direct admission track.

The College of Education also offers direct admission into the music Teacher Education Program. First-year students who, upon graduation from high school, have a high school g.p.a. of 3.00 or higher and have been accepted into a music studio will be directly admitted into the K-12 music Teacher Education Program. This admission is conditional until the minimum admission requirements are complete. The requirements include admission to the School of Music, completion of an essay in 500 words or less on why the applicant wishes to be a music teacher, completion of the 10-hour preadmission school field experience verification form, and completion of the Praxis Core with qualifying scores.

Graduate and Postbaccalaureate Admission to TEPs

Students who have completed a baccalaureate degree may be admitted to a Teacher Education Program (TEP) as graduate or undergraduate students. Students must apply to the TEP and to the Graduate College or the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. In some programs they may apply for a master's degree objective—either a Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) or in selected majors, a Master of Arts (M.A.).

Students who choose to pursue a graduate-level teacher preparation program must be eligible for admission to the Graduate College, which requires a g.p.a. of at least 3.00 in all previous college course work. They must submit an official Graduate Record Exam (GRE) General Test score report, with scores that meet the minimum score requirement. They also must submit a complete application to the Teacher Education Program; see the Graduate Admissions website.

Students also may apply to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences as postbaccalaureate students with senior standing. Students who choose this option must apply to the appropriate Teacher Education Program, following the undergraduate admissions procedure, and must meet the general requirements for undergraduate admission to the University of Iowa; see the Undergraduate Admissions website.

Priority application deadlines for graduate students and postbaccalaureate students with senior standing are March 1 and October 1.

TEP Standards and Policies

Students in the Teacher Education Program must meet grade-point average requirements each semester. Students who do not meet the requirements are placed on probation; those who fail to meet the requirements in a successive semester may be removed from the Teacher Education Program or denied admission to student teaching. For more information on standards and policies, consult the Office of Student Services.

Electronic Portfolio

Students in the Teacher Education Program document their achievement of professional standards on ePortfolio, a web-based program in which they collect instructional artifacts and performances assigned in all their courses. Students receive instruction on the ePortfolio requirement beginning with the required course EDTL:3002 Technology in the Classroom (teacher education) and EPLS:4180 Human Relations for the Classroom Teacher (educational leadership).

Teacher Leader Professional Development Program

Teachers from the University of Iowa are distinguished by their preparation with world-class faculty researchers and clinical practitioners and a one-of-a-kind professional development program that highlights contemporary issues in 21st-century education. All requirements must be completed prior to student teaching. All teacher education students are required to participate.

Student Teaching

The final phase of the Teacher Education Program (TEP) is the professional semester, devoted to supervised student teaching and directed observation in a variety of situations. The student teaching semester is a full-time, all-day, experience. Faculty members, professional staff, and advanced graduate students who are experienced teachers serve as supervisors.

Periodic seminars provide for discussion and evaluation of student teachers' experiences. Transfer credit may not be used to satisfy the student teaching requirement.

To be admitted to the student teaching semester, students must submit a separate application to the Office of Student Services in the College of Education. All course work in education, for the major, and for the degree must be completed before the student teaching semester. Applications are submitted during the calendar year before the student teaching semester. The deadline is November 15 for students planning to student teach the following fall semester and April 15 for students planning to student teach the following spring semester.

Admission to student teaching requires program area faculty approval as well as verification of satisfactory progress in meeting both College of Education professionalism standards and program area standards, which are set at the time of admission to the TEP. In some programs, standards are higher than the college's required g.p.a. of at least 2.70. Students should consult with their advisors regarding specific requirements for the program areas.

For more information, contact the Office of Student Services.

Waivers

Students who have completed courses that they wish to substitute for program requirements should consult with their advisors.

Urban Student Teaching

Students who want to advance their educational interests through student teaching in an urban setting may apply through the Office of Student Field Experiences. The urban districts include Clark County, Nevada (Las Vegas area); Chicago Public Schools; Aldine, Texas (Houston area); Rialto, California (Los Angeles area); and St. Louis Park, Minnesota (Minneapolis area). These options are open to all education majors who meet the requirements established for these student teaching sites. For more information about this and other programs, contact the Office of Student Services.

International Student Teaching

International student teaching experiences are available primarily through Global Gateway for Teachers, an Indiana University Program working in collaboration with the University of Iowa. Sites include Australia, China, Costa Rica, Ecuador, England and Wales, Greece, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, New Zealand, Norway, Russian Federation, Scotland, and Spain.

Interested students must meet the regular requirements for student teaching and must have the approval of their advisor and the appropriate program coordinator. In most locations, students are assisted with housing by the on-site coordinator.

International assignments are for eight weeks. Students complete an eight-week assignment in a stateside placement followed by an eight-week assignment in an international placement. Secondary education students in some program areas (for instance, English education) are required to complete a full semester of student teaching in the United States before student teaching at an international site.

For more information about international student teaching opportunities, contact the Office of Student Services.

Program Completion Assessment

As a requirement for completion of an approved Teacher Education Program for initial teaching licensure, the state of Iowa requires a program completion assessment. University of Iowa student teachers must pass the edTPA assessment of their program as a requirement for program completion.

Course Substitutions

Students who have completed courses that they wish to substitute for program requirements should consult with their advisors.

All University of Iowa students seeking an Iowa teaching license must complete EPLS:4180 Human Relations for the Classroom Teacher and EDTL:4900 Foundations of Special Education, or approved substitutes. Human relations courses offered through community colleges are not accepted.

Teacher Licensure/Certification

The Iowa Board of Educational Examiners issues teacher, support service, and administrator licenses on the recommendation of Iowa colleges and universities whose programs have been approved by the Iowa Department of Education. All University of Iowa preparation programs have Iowa Department of Education approval.

Licensure/certification requirements across the nation are subject to change. Students who plan to seek employment in a state other than Iowa should make every effort to be informed about current requirements in that state. Generally, students who apply out-of-state should first secure Iowa licensure.

To be recommended by the University of Iowa, applicants must complete all requirements of the appropriate approved program. A minimum of 20 s.h. of course work applied to meet program requirements must be earned at the University of Iowa.

The Iowa Board of Educational Examiners requires a national background check with fingerprinting for all new applicants for Iowa licensure. In the State of Iowa, applicants must be at least 21 years old to be granted a teaching license. Applicants who have been found guilty of a felony are barred from receiving an Iowa teaching license. Appeals may be filed directly with the Iowa Board of Educational Examiners.

The College of Education Office of Student Services provides Iowa application forms, fingerprinting procedures, and licensure/certification assistance to all students completing approved programs offered by the college. It also provides assistance to individuals interested in adding endorsements to their Iowa license based on completion of State of Iowa minimum licensure requirements.

Baker Teacher Leader Center

The Baker Teacher Leader Center (TLC) helps students in the Teacher Education Program realize their career and professional goals and become leaders as 21st-century teachers. The center provides students with access to key individuals in the Teacher Education Program (TEP) and offers core student support in one central location. Its technology-enhanced Learning Commons has collaborative work spaces for students, faculty, and staff. The facility models new and innovative technologies in education and supports seminars, workshops, and presentations. Community partnerships with area education agencies, community organizations, and schools provide access to classrooms where future teachers can innovate, improve, collaborate, develop, and discover their identities as teacher leaders.

Belin-Blank Center for Gifted Education and Talent Development

The Connie Belin and Jacqueline N. Blank International Center for Gifted Education and Talent Development conducts research, training, and service in gifted education and disseminates information on the education of gifted students.

Located in the Blank Honors Center, its programs and services include the Belin-Blank Fellowship Program in Gifted Education, practicum and internship experiences, and course work in gifted education (including coordinating the state endorsement). Precollege student programs include: Invent Iowa, Scholastic Art & Writing Awards, above-level testing for students in grades 2-9, precollege summer and academic year programs for high-ability students in grades 2-11, and programs for international students. The center also administers the Iowa Online Advanced Placement Academy and the Wallace Assessment and Counseling Clinic, which specializes in twice-exceptionality; and the Acceleration Institute, which is dedicated to the study of curricular acceleration for academically talented children. 

In addition to the honors program for College of Education students, the Center administers three University-level student programs: the Iowa Talent Project, developed for under-represented minority students from gifted programs in Des Moines and Cedar Rapids, Iowa; the Bucksbaum Early Entrance STEAM Academy, a highly selective early-entrance program for students who have completed their sophomore or junior year in high school; and the Hong Kong Scholars Program, an early decision program that admits selected high school seniors from Hong Kong to the University of Iowa.

The center also provides practicum and internship experiences for undergraduate and graduate students and coordinates course work for the Iowa Talented and Gifted Endorsement. For more information, contact the Belin-Blank Center.

Blommers Measurement Resources Library

The Paul Blommers Measurement Resources Library includes books, journals, research reports, and reference materials related to educational and psychological measurement, testing, assessment, and evaluation, as well as an extensive collection of published and unpublished tests. The library supports the teaching and research needs of faculty, staff, and students at the University of Iowa, primarily serving the College of Education.

Center for Advanced Studies in Measurement and Assessment

The Center for Advanced Studies in Measurement and Assessment (CASMA) pursues interdisciplinary research-based initiatives that lead to advances in the methods and practice of educational measurement and assessment. CASMA performs, promotes, fosters, and disseminates research in measurement and psychometric methodologies that respond to contemporary needs and initiatives in testing.

Currently, the center devotes considerable resources to research on equating, scaling, and generalizability theory; it also offers workshops and training sessions on those topics. Extensive free suites of computer programs are available on the CASMA website. The site also features research reports and technical notes on measurement topics such as generalizability theory, equating methods, and linking with item response theory.

Center for Disability Research and Education

The Center for Disability Research and Education (CDRE) provides a bridge between research and practice to facilitate interdisciplinary collaboration and implementation of evidence-based practices and to conduct research that meets the needs of individuals with disabilities.

Center for Evaluation and Assessment

The Center for Evaluation and Assessment (CEA) conducts evaluations, research studies, and professional development initiatives. The center's mission is to promote the sound use of assessment results, provide high-quality evaluation services to clients, create effective training activities for graduate students, improve the quality of evaluation theory and practice, and contribute to research on program evaluation and assessment.

The center conducts evaluations in a broad range of areas: clinical and translational science, minority recruitment and retention, delivery of social and human services, curriculum and instruction, professional training, and the impact of public policy on PK-12 education. The center's staff members consult with universities, school systems, and other policy-making organizations in Iowa and nationwide that use evaluation studies and assessments to make important decisions regarding individuals or organizations. The center also provides training and professional development in program evaluation and assessment.

Center for Research on Undergraduate Education

The Center for Research on Undergraduate Education (CRUE) is dedicated to the study of undergraduate education in America, from how academic and social experiences affect students to the methods schools use to improve students' chances for success in the classroom and beyond graduation. CRUE brings a methodologically balanced approach to the study of undergraduate education.

College of Education Writing Resource

The Writing Resource provides graduate students with a writing tutor who can assist with academic writing to revise, discuss, and offer a one-to-one workshop setting as graduate students prepare papers. This is a collaborative process, requiring both student and tutor to improve the paper's content.

Cooperating Schools Program

The Cooperating Schools Program (CSP) is a University-wide service that facilitates placement of research projects and service-learning projects conducted by faculty, staff, and students in public schools throughout Iowa. The program provides information to help researchers obtain permission to conduct research in Iowa schools. The Cooperating Schools Program was instituted at the request of school administrators charged with the responsibility of approving research projects in their schools.

Education Technology Center

The Education Technology Center (ETC) provides computer services to College of Education faculty, staff, and students. In addition to Internet access, services include collegiate file and application servers; standard office tools; specialized applications such as media production tools and qualitative and quantitative analysis programs; secure folders and directories; and electronic mailing lists for faculty, staff, and student groups. The ETC also provides website and digital signage (kiosk) development for College of Education departments, offices, and groups.

The Education Technology Center provides faculty with technical and design support for online course management, research technologies, distance education, multimedia, and ePortfolio production.

Polycom videoconferencing, SMART Boards and SMART Podiums, and wireless access are available throughout the college. Every classroom and conference room has a digital presentation system, and five classrooms are outfitted for videoconferencing and distance education instruction.

Faculty members and students can check out wireless laptops, computer projectors, audience response systems (clickers), digital audio recorders, digital video cameras, iPads, and other devices from the center. In all, the College of Education supports more than 850 computers, laptops, PDAs, and smartphones as well as seven servers.

Grants and Research Services Center

The Grants and Research Services Center (GRSC) provides grant and research-related support services for the college's faculty, staff, and students. GRSC staff members help identify internal and external funding sources, prepare and submit grant proposals and application materials, provide grant accounting services, and help in the preparation of applications for Human Subjects/Institutional Research Board review. The college also provides limited funds for faculty research, professional development, and travel.

Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Ethics

The Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Ethics (IDARE) is a cross-disciplinary, cross-institutional online community of scholars. Its goal is to use research, education, and consultation to improve the quality of ethical practice experienced by people with disabilities who receive services from rehabilitation, health, mental health, and social service professionals. IDARE works to influence disability policy and practice development nationally and locally and to influence professional organizations' consideration of ethical issues that affect people with disabilities and other marginalized populations.

Iowa Center for Assistive Technology Education and Research

The Iowa Center for Assistive Technology Education and Research (ICATER) helps to ensure equal access and opportunities for people of all ages with disabilities by advancing assistive technology through research, education, and service. ICATER's primary purpose is instructing preservice teachers and others in education about technology that can help struggling students and students with disabilities to access the general education curriculum. The center collaborates with College of Education, University, and community programs to provide technical assistance that enhances the services and resources available to educators and persons with disabilities. It also sponsors courses, workshops, and education programs. The center's assistive technology laboratory is available for student and faculty use, demonstrations, consultations, and research.

Iowa Supports Education and Resources for Veterans and Enlisted

Iowa Supports Education and Resources for Veterans and Enlisted (I-SERVE) was created to help facilitate successful transitions for veterans and enlisted service members into higher education at the University of Iowa. The center is located in the Teacher Leader Center, on the first floor of the North Lindquist Center. The program assists veterans with accessing benefits, the application process, completing course work, preparing for and searching for jobs, and achieving overall career success.

Iowa Testing Programs

Iowa Testing Programs (ITP) provides assessment expertise to schools in the State of Iowa and consultation to the Iowa Department of Education and to area education agencies. Its faculty and staff develop standardized educational tests, such as the widely used Iowa Assessments, for use in elementary and secondary schools, as well as other assessment tools to support instruction and learning. Iowa Testing Programs also conducts research studies in educational measurement and evaluation, publishes the results of these studies, sponsors lectures and symposia, provides consulting and in-service training to educators and school systems, and provides training experience for graduate students in educational measurement and evaluation.

Libraries

University of Iowa Libraries provides a wide variety of resources in print and online. Course reserve materials are available at the Main Library, just across the street from the College of Education; at the Hardin Library for the Health Sciences, on the health sciences campus; and at the Science Library, near the center of campus. An education librarian, whose office is in the College of Education, is available to help students with their research projects and assist faculty members and teaching assistants with their research and instructional needs.

Office of Graduate Teaching Excellence

The Office of Graduate Teaching Excellence (OGTE) is dedicated to excellence in college teaching and the preparation of future faculty. The office facilitates opportunities for research, teaching, and service. Through the Iowa Education Fellows Program (i-fellows), OGTE develops and conducts workshops and seminars that address the developmental needs of College of Education doctoral students, from their first semester on campus through completion of their degrees. The office also guides students through the process of earning the graduate Certificate in College Teaching (Graduate College).

Office of Student Services

The Office of Student Services assists students, faculty, staff, and the general public in graduate and undergraduate admission, Graduate College examinations, student field experiences, and teacher licensure/certification. It also serves as a liaison with other University units, including the Graduate College, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the Office of Admissions, and the Office of the Registrar, and with external agencies, including the Iowa Department of Education, out-of-state teacher licensure/certification departments, and school district personnel in Iowa and outside of the state. A variety of application and information materials are available at the office and on its website.

Statistics Outreach Center

The Statistics Outreach Center (SOC), a service of the College of Education and Iowa Testing Programs, helps the college's faculty, staff, and students use quantitative statistical methods to produce high-quality research. The center offers short-term consulting on statistical data analysis and grant proposals to the College of Education at no charge and provides services to departments and grants outside the college on a fee basis. The SOC also offers a variety of educational opportunities involving statistical software. Information on course schedules, events, resources, and an appointment request form is available on the Statistics Outreach Center website.

UI Helping Professional Workshops

The UI Helping Professionals Workshops (IHELP) program provides affordable workshops intended to enhance the personal and professional development of helping professionals. The program offers Continuing Education Units (CEU's) for community, agency, and education practitioners working with or interested in individuals, groups, families, and organizations.

College of Education students may be eligible for scholarships, awards, or graduate assistantships. Information about financial support for students is available at Scholarships and Awards on the college's website. The Graduate College posts a list of open assistantships on its website; see Graduate Grants and Assistantships.

Students interested in employment opportunities in the college's support units and special resources should contact the director of each facility and indicate their interests, their academic and experience records, and their career or degree goals at the University of Iowa.

Graduate Assistantships

Individual academic programs provide opportunities for teaching, research, or service assistantships as well as for fellowships and related employment opportunities. Inquiries should be addressed to the chair of the department or the director of the program in which students believe they can provide service or achieve an outstanding academic record. Assistantship appointments are usually, but not always, made by the program area.

Special Graduate Research Assistantships in Education

The Iowa Testing Programs provides funds to support a limited number of special graduate assistantships in education, in which students do research work under the direction of a faculty member of their choice. Students must be enrolled for at least 6 s.h. but not more than 12 s.h. per semester; assistantships are for the academic year and are renewable for a limited number of years. Students admitted to or pursuing any advanced degree program offered by the College of Education are eligible to apply, provided they are committed to a professional career in the United States.

Applicants must submit transcripts of all completed college work (undergraduate and graduate), recommendation forms specific to the assistantship, and scores on the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) General Test. For assistantship application forms, contact the Iowa Testing Programs director. Application deadline is late February.

Scholarships and Awards

The College of Education presents a number of awards funded by donors; recipients must meet the criteria established by the donors for their awards. Recipients are presented with their award at a spring semester luncheon. For more information, see Scholarships and Awards on the college's website.

Duane D. Anderson Memorial Scholarship: awarded to a transfer student from an Iowa community college who is currently enrolled in a program in the College of Education.

Jack Bagford Elementary Education Scholarship: presented to an undergraduate or graduate student in elementary education who will be student teaching during the academic year following the award; recipient must be a resident of Iowa.

David and Connie Belin Honors Award: presented to graduating seniors who have completed all requirements for the Honors Opportunity Program.

Blommers-Hieronymus-Feldt Fellowship: presented to doctoral students in educational measurement and statistics.

Lowell Brandt Rehabilitation Counseling Award: presented to graduate students pursuing a master's degree in the rehabilitation counseling program.

Barry Bratton Memorial Award: presented to graduate students who have completed course work that reflects a commitment to the systemic design and improvement of instructional processes and materials.

Dr. Bettye M. Caldwell and Dr. Fred T. Caldwell Scholarship: presented to undergraduate students interested in pursuing careers in early childhood development including the fields of education, sociology, psychology, and other related academic programs.

Jake and Kimberly Chung Scholarship: presented to a teacher education student for their student teaching semester.

Debra Clausen Memorial Scholarship: presented to a graduate student in the College of Education who will work at the Hospital School (now the Center for Disabilities and Development) to evaluate and develop learning programs for students with mental disabilities, including Down Syndrome, or to students pursuing careers in special education.

T. Anne Cleary Psychological Research Scholarship: presented to students in the Department of Psychological and Quantitative Foundations.

Laurie Jane Croft Scholarship: presented to deserving undergraduate or graduate students in the College of Education who are pursuing an endorsement certificate in gifted education.

Beulah A. and Robert L. Darrow Scholarship: presented to deserving students in the College of Education.

John Leonard Davies Scholarship: presented to a student who is a first- or second-semester senior in the Department of Teaching and Learning who is viewed as being creative and having outstanding potential for success in the field of K-12 education.

Harvey H. Davis Memorial Scholarship: presented to outstanding graduate students in educational leadership with preference given to students interested in the financing of education.

College of Education Dean's Scholars: presented to high achieving students who desire to become teachers.

Dr. Mary Agnella Gunn Memorial Scholarship: presented to worthy undergraduate or graduate students in education.

John H. Haefner Memorial Scholarship: presented to a student who will be student teaching in the area of social studies.

Gladys and Margaret Harvey Education Scholarship: presented to students who show financial need and are enrolled in the College of Education.

Emma E. Holmes Education Scholarship: presented to an outstanding undergraduate or graduate student in any program in the College of Education; based on merit and need, the recipient must be a U.S. citizen with first preference for a student in the top 20 percent of their class, second preference for a student with demonstrated financial need.

Albert Hood Promising Scholar Award: presented to a doctoral student in the Department of Rehabilitation and Counselor Education and a student in the higher education and student affairs program with an approved prospectus.

H.D. Hoover Scholarship: presented to a graduate student working on mathematics achievement testing in the elementary grades.

Howard K. and Mathilda Ihrke Student Success Scholarships: presented to first-generation undergraduate and graduate students in the Teacher Education Program.

Howard R. Jones Achievement Award: presented to worthy undergraduate or graduate students in education.

Kyle C. and Eula B. Jones Scholarship: presented to undergraduate and graduate students planning careers in elementary and secondary education and administration.

Charlotte and Ruby Junge Scholarship: presented to undergraduate or graduate students in elementary or secondary education who will be student teaching for a full semester.

Daniel G. Loetscher Memorial Science Education Scholarship: presented to students pursuing secondary education with an emphasis in the sciences, with preference given to those pursuing an emphasis in chemistry.

Perry Eugene McClenahan Memorial Scholarship: presented to an outstanding graduate student in educational administration.

Sheila E. McFarland Memorial Scholarship: presented to a student who will be student teaching for a full semester in the area of elementary education, preference for this award will be given to an Iowa resident.

Leonard A. Miller Memorial Scholarship: presented to an outstanding first-year M.A. student in rehabilitation counseling.

Minority Student Award: presented to undergraduate or graduate students of color.

Helen Mackin Nichol Memorial Scholarship: presented to students from Iowa who are in secondary education and plan to teach and work with mentally and emotionally disturbed children.

Melvin R. Novick Award in Educational Measurement and Statistics: presented to a third- or fourth-year doctoral student in educational measurement and statistics who has at least a year of study remaining.

Paul Opstad Scholarship: presented to a full- or part-time graduate student in the College of Education whose career or scholarly interests focus on the concerns and needs of international students.

Margaret P. Park Scholarship: presented to deserving students in the College of Education with preference given to students from St. Louis County, Minnesota; Rock Island County, Illinois; or Iowa.

Ernest T. Pascarella Military Veteran Promise Award: presented to a graduate student veteran in the College of Education who demonstrates exceptional career promise.

Guy and Gladys Peterson Scholarship: presented to students admitted to the Teacher Education Program who have completed at least 12 s.h. of education course work.

Betty Piercy Award: presented to a deserving student in the field of reading.

Ann Ramsey and Richard E. Posey Scholarship: presented to a student who is a junior pursuing a career in teaching or education.

Rolland Ray Award: presented to doctoral students completing a dissertation concerned with measurement in mathematics education, science education, social studies education, or English education.

Mary Maxine Redmond Scholarship: presented to undergraduate students from Iowa enrolled in the College of Education.

Albert and Martha Ruffalo First Generation Education Scholarship: presented to deserving students in the College of Education who are first-generation college students.

Judith Young Saunders Scholarship: presented to an undergraduate or graduate student who is pursuing a degree in teacher education, with preference given to students with severe visual impairments.

Judy Skalsky Memorial Scholarship: presented to an undergraduate or graduate student majoring in art education.

Margaret A. Sloan Scholarship: presented to undergraduate or graduate students in the College of Education.

Lloyd Smith Scholarship: presented to students in elementary social studies.

Maureen Medberry Snell Education Award: presented to outstanding students in the College of Education.

Carol M. and Ed Stenson Scholarship in Education: presented to undergraduate students pursuing a special education certification or degree in general teacher education who exhibit both financial need and academic merit.

Drs. Andrew and Jeanne Stevenson Scholarship: presented to students in the College of Education with preference to students studying science education who plan to one day teach science education.

Franklin D. Stone and Louise P. Stone International Scholarship: presented to an outstanding international student pursuing a Ph.D. in the College of Education.

James and Coretta Stroud Fellowship: presented to an outstanding graduate student in educational psychology.

Grace Phelps Stucker Scholarship: presented to an undergraduate or graduate teacher education student.

Edgar M. and Evelyn Benzler Tanruther Scholarship: presented to undergraduate and/or graduate students in elementary education.

University High School Innovative Development in Education Award (IDEA): presented to students during their secondary student teaching experience.

Emily C. Wagner Scholarship: presented to an undergraduate student in secondary education with an English education teaching degree who will be student teaching in the academic year following the award, preference for students who are residents of Iowa with a g.p.a. of at least 3.00 and demonstrated financial need.

Erwin and Louise Wasta International Scholarship: presented to an international student in the College of Education.

Most College of Education courses are offered by the college's departments and programs. They are listed and described in the corresponding General Catalog sections.

The college also offers the following interdepartmental courses.

Education Interdepartmental Courses

EALL:4081 ePortfolio Design and Production1-2 s.h.

Experience producing an ePortfolio and uploading it to the Internet; practical experience using digital tools, content and design related to ePortfolio production; experience using a web browser and access to the Internet and to a digital camera or scanner. Requirements: able to perform basic computer functions and use a World Wide Web browser. Same as EDTL:4081, EPLS:4081, PSQF:4081, RCE:4081.

EALL:4130 Introduction to Grant Writing3 s.h.

Comprehensive training in grant proposal writing; basics of project development and management; core principles for writing small and large proposals to public and private funding sources; finer points of grant writing to increase competiveness of future proposals and applications; for students with limited grant writing experience. Same as MUSM:4150.

EALL:5150 Introduction to Educational Research3 s.h.

Principles of empirical educational research; logic of inquiry for both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies.

EALL:7387 Introduction to Online Post-Secondary Course Design and Facilitation3 s.h.

Knowledge of distance learning and teaching at the post-secondary level; instructional design principles relevant to development of online courses.

EALL:7475 Ph.D. ePortfolio in College Teaching3 s.h.

Framework for connecting authentic evidence of scholarly work and teaching competencies; use of advanced web and multimedia technologies to link artifacts to ePortfolio templates.

Education Honors Opportunity Program Courses

EHOP:4100 Honors Seminar in Education2 s.h.

Research in education and related professions in collaboration with a College of Education faculty member of student's choice; preparation for senior honors project.

EHOP:4101 Senior Honors Project1-2 s.h.

Collaboration with a faculty member on research project; written report. Prerequisites: EHOP:4100.