The Doctor of Philosophy program in counseling psychology requires a minimum of 111 s.h. of graduate credit. All students must study full time. The program is fully accredited by the American Psychological Association.

The Ph.D. program's goal is to prepare counseling psychologists who will promote psychology as a science and contribute to the advancement of the profession. The faculty endorses a scientist/practitioner model of training and expects students to become competent researchers and proficient practitioners. Graduates find positions in a variety of settings, including higher education, counseling centers, clinics, private practice settings, and hospitals.

Students in the program must show appropriate levels of emotional balance and interpersonal skills and act within the American Psychological Association's Ethical Principles of Psychologists. For more information, contact the program director.

The Ph.D. program in counseling psychology requires the following work.

Research Requirement

All of these:
PSQF:6243Intermediate Statistical Methods4
PSQF:7331Seminar: Educational Psychology I - Current Topics (when topic is qualitative educational research methods)3
PSQF:7394Supervised Research in Counseling Psychology (at least 4 s.h. is required; students enroll for 1 s.h. per semester for up to four semesters)4
One of these:
PSQF:6244Correlation and Regression4
PSQF:6246Design of Experiments4

Qualitative and quantitative methodology is discussed in PSQF:7394 Supervised Research in Counseling Psychology, which is directed each semester by faculty advisors. Research from each student is discussed and evaluated, critiqued, and supported.

Basic Psychology

All students are required to have a thorough grounding in the basic discipline of psychology. This may be achieved through a minimum of 3 s.h. of credit in each of the following four areas: biological bases of behavior, cognitive-affective bases of behavior, social bases of behavior, and history and systems. Students complete an additional 6 s.h. in the area of individual differences.

Counseling Psychology Core

All of these:
PSQF:6223 & PSQF:6225Introduction to Counseling Psychology Practice/Research I-II6
PSQF:6235Multicultural Counseling3
PSQF:7305Psychotherapy I: Dynamic and Phenomenological Approaches3
PSQF:7306Psychotherapy III: Work Psychology and Career Interventions3
PSQF:7309Personality Assessment3
PSQF:7310Intelligence Assessment3
PSQF:7356Process and Outcomes in Counseling Psychotherapy3
PSQF:7365Psychotherapy II: Cognitive and Behavioral Approaches3
PSQF:7434Practicum in Counseling Psychology3
PSQF:7452Leadership, Consultation, and Supervision3
PSQF:7453Advanced Practicum in Counseling Psychology (repeatable)1-3
PSQF:7465Issues and Ethics in Professional Psychology3

Students must enroll in practicums to reach a specified level of client contact, supervision, and additional experience hours. The first practicum's site is typically University Counseling Service. Subsequent placements at other sites must have prior approval of the counseling psychology faculty. Students must successfully complete one semester of PSQF:6299 M.A. Project: Portfolio/Internship/Practicum before enrolling in PSQF:7453 Advanced Practicum in Counseling Psychology.

Electives

Elective courses are determined in collaboration with the major advisor.

Internship

Students spend a calendar year in an internship setting approved by the counseling psychology faculty. The faculty determines student readiness to apply for the internship based on completion of all or almost all required course work, satisfactory progress toward completion of the portfolio requirement, and successful completion of practicum requirements. Internships usually require geographic relocation.

Comprehensive Exam and Dissertation

Comprehensive examinations are written in counseling psychology ethics and issues. The comprehensive examination is structured as a component of the portfolio review. For more information, contact the program coordinator.

The dissertation research study is planned in collaboration with the doctoral student's major advisor. Dissertation credit ranges from 12 to 15 s.h.

Admission

Applicants to the Ph.D. program in counseling psychology must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate College. Preference is given to applicants who have an undergraduate g.p.a. above 3.00 and a graduate g.p.a. above 3.50; an undergraduate major, minor, or substantial course work in psychology; a Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test verbal score of 152 or higher, quantitative score of 151 or higher, and analytical writing score of 3.5 or higher; and previous research and counseling experience.

Application materials must include a Graduate College application form; official transcripts of all previous college work; an official report of GRE General Test scores (the GRE advanced test in psychology is recommended but not required); a personal statement outlining career goals and reasons for seeking advanced training in counseling psychology; and three letters of recommendation from individuals qualified to assess the applicant's potential for completing the doctoral program. The faculty encourages applications from minorities, women, and persons from a wide range of backgrounds and academic preparation. The program typically accepts between five and eight students each year.

Students begin the program in fall. Application deadline is December 1; admission decisions usually are made by March 1. Applicants are invited to campus for interviews before final selection.

The Doctor of Philosophy program in educational measurement and statistics requires a minimum of 90 s.h. of graduate credit. The program prepares students for senior professional positions in educational measurement, evaluation, and statistical methods. Graduates find employment in colleges and universities, state and federal agencies, large public and private school systems, test publishing firms, and research centers.

During the first year of graduate study, a student and the advisor plan a program of study that is appropriate for the student's interests and vocational objectives. The typical program involves advanced work in educational measurement, data analysis methods, research methodology, and educational psychology. Work in other University of Iowa departments is encouraged.

Students who concentrate in statistics and intend to teach at the college level take courses in the mathematical theory of statistics. Those who concentrate in educational measurement and evaluation take appropriate courses in curriculum, counseling, or higher education. All students are required to develop familiarity with computer programming techniques and equipment.

Students who enter the program without completing an M.A. thesis must complete a substitute project before taking the Ph.D. comprehensive examinations.

After completing most of their course work, students take the comprehensive examination, which typically consists of three 3-hour written examinations on educational measurement, applied statistics, and program evaluation, or approved substitute areas, such as educational psychology or mathematical statistics, in which a student has completed at least 9 s.h. of course work. In place of one written examination, the student's committee may assign a project involving analytical and evaluative skills, or research creativity. The written examinations are followed by an oral examination in which the committee seeks further evidence of the student's command of the three fields. A single decision is made on all aspects of the comprehensive examination.

Work for the Ph.D. concludes with the dissertation, which is included in the 90 s.h. required for the degree.

Research Requirement

One of these:
PSQF:6220Quantitative Educational Research Methodologies3
An equivalent course comparable in content and level of rigor, such as EALL:5150

Quantitative Requirements

This course:
PSQF:6243Intermediate Statistical Methods4
Two of these:
PSQF:6244Correlation and Regression4
PSQF:6246Design of Experiments4
PSQF:6247Nonparametric Statistical Methods3
PSQF:6249Factor Analysis and Structural Equation Models3
PSQF:6252Introduction to Multivariate Statistical Methods3
EPLS:6206Research Process and Design3
EPLS:6209Survey Research and Design3
EPLS:6370Quantitative Methods for Policy Analysis3

 Qualitative Requirements

One of these (may be taken on a non-graded basis with approval of a student's program and advisor):
PSQF:7331Seminar: Educational Psychology I - Current Topics (when topic is qualitative educational research methods)3
EDTL:7070Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Literacy Research3
EPLS:7373Qualitative Research Design and Methods3
RCE:7338Essentials of Qualitative Inquiry3
An equivalent course comparable in content and level of rigor
One of these:
PSQF:5165Introduction to Program and Project Evaluation3
PSQF:6265Program Evaluation3
PSQF:7331Seminar: Educational Psychology I - Current Topics (when topic is conducting research online)3
CNW:6654Forms of the Essay (when topic is the ethnographic essay)arr.
EDTL:6267Seminar: Current Issues in Art Education (when topic is qualitative methods)3-4
EDTL:7071Critical Discourse Analysis in Educational Research3
EDTL:7072Advanced Methods of Literacy Research: Qualitative Data Analysis and Reporting3
EDTL:7073Ethnographic Methods, Theories, and Texts3
EDTL:7410Mixed Methods Research3
EDTL:7751Advanced Qualitative Data Analysis3
EDTL:7774Qualitative Research with Computer-Aided Qualitative Data Analysis Software3
EDTL:7953Seminar: Single Subject Design Research3
EPLS:5195Research in Cross-Cultural Settings3
EPLS:5240Topics in Education (when topic is introduction to historical methodology)arr.
HIST:7197The Art and Craft of Historical Writingarr.
HIST:7199History Workshop: Theory and Interpretationarr.
RCE:7438Advanced Qualitative Research Seminar in Rehabilitation and Counselor Education3
RCE:7444Qualitative Research in the Multicultural Context3

Admission

Applicants to the Ph.D. program in educational measurement and statistics must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate College. They must have a combined verbal and quantitative score of at least 300 on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test and must hold an M.A. from an accredited institution. At least one year of professional experience in teaching, research, or a related field is desirable. Applicants who expect to concentrate in statistics should have training in college mathematics through differential and integral calculus. Applicants who do not meet these requirements but who show offsetting evidence of superior ability may be granted conditional admission.

Applicants must submit a statement of purpose that explains how the educational measurement and statistics program will help them accomplish their educational and vocational goals.

For information about admission dates, contact the educational measurement and statistics program coordinator.

Educational psychology is characterized by empirical research and theory typical of the social and behavioral sciences. The Doctor of Philosophy program in educational psychology requires a minimum of 72 s.h. of graduate credit. It is designed to help students master the core content and methods of educational psychology and acquire the depth of knowledge and methodological sophistication necessary for original research that contributes to the discipline.

Students work closely with their advisor to define a program that matches their goals and interests. They develop a plan of study in consultation with their advisors. Those who begin the program after earning a master's degree or with course work from another program may be able to waive some of the Ph.D. program's requirements. Students who enter the program without completion of a M.A. thesis are required to complete a research practicum in which students assist with and later design and carry out original research during their first or second year. Students who have completed an empirical M.A. thesis acceptable to the faculty may omit the second-year project.

The program of study includes substantive areas within educational psychology and the learning sciences, including courses in cognition, development, learning theory, and the design of instruction, learning environments, and learning technologies. Other learning opportunities include a research practicum in which students assist with and eventually design and carry out original research, a slate of research courses that meet the College of Education’s research requirements, a minor area of the student’s choice, and a dissertation in the student’s area of interest.

Research Requirement

The heart of educational psychology as a field is the creation, dissemination, and use of rigorous research to better understand and address educational issues. While many of the required courses address various aspects of the guiding principles set out by the National Research Council, students engage in the following course work and research-related activities.

Quantitative and Qualitative Research Methods

Both of these:
PSQF:6220Quantitative Educational Research Methodologies3
PSQF:7331Seminar: Educational Psychology I - Current Topics (when topic is qualitative educational research methods)3

Statistics

Central to understanding research in the field is the understanding and use of statistical methods. 

This course:
PSQF:6243Intermediate Statistical Methods4

Quantitative Methods

Based on the types of questions encountered in the field, students benefit from additional exposure to quantitative methods.

One of these:
PSQF:6244Correlation and Regression4
PSQF:6246Design of Experiments4
PSQF:6247Nonparametric Statistical Methods3
PSQF:6252Introduction to Multivariate Statistical Methods3

Research Project

In consultation with a faculty member, students design, implement, and present an original second-year research study. This experience provides the opportunity to conduct a pilot study that will strengthen their thesis in terms of methods, instruments, theoretical grounding, or focus of research question. Student presentations of their research are open to the public. Students are encouraged to submit their study results for broader dissemination at a local, regional, or national conference.

PSQF:6230Research in Educational Psychology3

Additional Course Work

To develop specific competencies that are related to research, doctoral students in educational psychology are encouraged to select from the following elective courses.

PSQF:6245Applied Multivariate Analysis3
PSQF:6257Educational Measurement and Evaluation3
PSQF:6265Program Evaluation3
PSQF:7331Seminar: Educational Psychology I - Current Topics (when topic is research writing in education or conducting research online; 3 s.h. each)3
Advanced qualitative course (consult with advisor)
Mixed methods course (consult with advisor)

Research-Related Activities

Students are encouraged to participate in research experiences beyond their course work. They are encouraged to:

  • attend research conferences as a presenter or audience member;
  • become members of professional research organizations such as the American Educational Research Association;
  • volunteer as proposal reviewers for conferences in their areas of expertise later in their program of study; and
  • work with faculty members on faculty research projects.

Required Courses

All of these:
PSQF:6200Educational Psychology3
PSQF:6205Design of Instruction3
PSQF:6281Cognitive Theories of Learning3
PSQF:7493Ph.D. Thesis in Psychological and Quantitative Foundations (minimum requirement)10

Core Courses

Selection of courses depends on a student's area of specialization.

At least 15 s.h. from these:
PSQF:6203Tools and External Representations in Learning Processes3
PSQF:6204Foundations of the Learning Sciences3
PSQF:6206Advanced Child Development3
PSQF:6208Designing Educational Multimedia3
PSQF:6214Design of Learning Environments: Theory, Practice, and Method3
PSQF:6215Web-Based Learning3
PSQF:6275Constructivism and Design of Instruction3
PSQF:7331Seminar: Educational Psychology I - Current Topics (topics vary; may be repeated if content is related to educational psychology)arr.

Electives

Students may take up to 9 s.h. of elective course work. Students can take PSQF:6217 Seminar in College Teaching and/or additional research courses. See "Research Requirement" above. Other courses may be included in consultation with the advisor.

Minor Area

Students must complete a minimum of 12 s.h. that constitute a coherent program of course work outside educational psychology and beyond the courses listed above. The minor area may be from a foundation discipline such as mathematics education, educational philosophy, or program evaluation. Courses must be numbered 5000 or above, can span across departments and colleges, and must be consistent with a plan approved by a student's advisor.

Comprehensive Examination

The Ph.D. comprehensive examination emphasizes competence and depth in one or more narrowly defined areas of research and theory. Students choose from three options in consultation with their advisor and with the approval of the examining committee, composed of five faculty members and does not necessarily include the same faculty members as the dissertation committee. The options are a review article, an extended research activity, or a traditional comprehensive examination. For details of each option's requirements, contact the Department of Psychological and Quantitative Foundations.

Admission

Applicants to the Ph.D. program in educational psychology must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate College, including the minimum grade-point average. They must have a verbal score of at least 150 and a quantitative score of at least 152 on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test; successful applicants usually score higher. International applicants whose first language is not English must submit acceptable scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Applicants who do not meet all admission requirements may be granted conditional admission on the basis of other evidence, such as high grade-point average, strong academic preparation, and highly supportive recommendations. Conditional admission is rare.

Admission is for fall entry. Application deadline is January 15; late applications might not be considered. Review of applications begins soon after, when applicants who wish to be considered for fellowships and other awards are screened. Admission decisions are announced approximately six weeks after the application deadline.

Applicants who accept admission or financial aid and do not relinquish either one on or before April 15 may not solicit or accept another offer. Offers made by the program after April 15 include the provision that the offer is void if the applicant has accepted and continues to hold a previous offer from another program listed in the American Psychological Association publication Graduate Study in Psychology and Associated Fields. This policy is consistent with standards set by the association's Board of Educational Affairs.

The Doctor of Philosophy program in school psychology requires a minimum of 125 s.h. of graduate credit. The program is fully accredited by the American Psychological Association.

The program's goal is to prepare doctoral-level school psychologists who will promote psychology as a science and contribute to the advancement of the profession. The faculty endorses a scientist/practitioner model of training and expects students to become competent researchers and proficient practitioners.

Ph.D. students develop a plan of study in consultation with their academic advisors. All students are required to have a thorough grounding in the basic discipline of psychology, which may be achieved through earning a minimum of 3 s.h. of credit in each of the following areas: biological bases of behavior, cognitive/affective bases of behavior, social bases of behavior, individual differences, and history and systems.

Students are required to complete yearly portfolio reviews, which include oral examinations; carry out a preliminary dissertation research project equivalent in scope to an M.A. thesis; participate in an internship; and complete a doctoral dissertation, earning a minimum of 10 s.h. in PSQF:7493 Ph.D. Thesis in Psychological and Quantitative Foundations.

Research Requirement

To receive credit for additional courses, students must obtain prior approval from their advisor and the school psychology program.

All of these:
PSQF:6243Intermediate Statistical Methods4
PSQF:6244Correlation and Regression4
PSQF:6246Design of Experiments4
PSQF:7331Seminar: Educational Psychology I - Current Topics (when topic is qualitative educational research methods)3

Program Core

The following courses are required.

All of these:
PSQF:6238Assessment of Learning Differences (taken with PSQF:7237)3-4
PSQF:6251Individual Intelligence Testing (taken with PSQF:7237)3
PSQF:6263Consultation Theory and Practice (taken with PSQF:7337)3
PSQF:7224Introduction to School Psychology Practice3
PSQF:7237Beginning Practicum in School Psychological Service (minimum of 150 hours required)3
PSQF:7313Psychopathology in Childhood3
PSQF:7315Social and Emotional Assessment of Children and Adolescents3
PSQF:7337Advanced Practicum in School Psychology (minimum of 750 hours required)12
PSQF:7352Seminar: Behavioral Assessment and Evaluation3
PSQF:7367Social Psychology and Social Systems3
PSQF:7380Practicum in College Teaching (optional)1-3
PSQF:7390Supervision of School Psychology Practicum/Internship1
PSQF:7437Internship in School Psychology (one year full-time or two years half-time; total of 1800 hours required)3
Program course work in evaluation

Students must enroll in practicums to reach a specified level of client contact, supervision, and additional experience hours. Placements must have prior approval of the school psychology faculty. Students must successfully complete one semester of PSQF:7237 Beginning Practicum in School Psychological Service before enrolling in PSQF:7337 Advanced Practicum in School Psychology. Students must adhere to the most recent ethical principles and standards of the American Psychological Association.

Admission

Applicants to the Ph.D. program in school psychology must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate College. Preference is given to applicants with an undergraduate major in psychology or education and a g.p.a. above 3.00. A combined verbal and quantitative score of 308 or higher and an analytic writing score of 4 or higher on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test are recommended but not required. The faculty also encourages applications from individuals with an M.A. or Ed.S. and experience as psychologists or other human service providers.

Applications must include three letters of recommendation, a personal statement of interest and goals, and a writing sample. Complete application materials, including transcripts and test scores, must be received by January 1 to be considered for fall entry. Admission decisions are usually made by March 15. The program admits from six to eight students each year.