The Radiation Sciences Program offers two paths toward completing the major:

  • an on-campus program in radiologic technology, diagnostic medical sonography, or radiation therapy for students who have not completed a radiation sciences modality; or
  • an online program for registered radiologic technologists who would like to earn a Bachelor of Science degree by distance education.

Undergraduate study in radiation sciences is guided by the academic rules and procedures outlined under Undergraduate Programs of Study in the Carver College of Medicine section of the Catalog.

The Bachelor of Science with a major in radiation sciences requires a minimum of 120 s.h. Work for the on-campus degree path includes a set of courses that are prerequisite to entering the radiation sciences major, completion of one of six radiation sciences professional programs, and elective course work sufficient to complete the minimum of 120 s.h. required for graduation. Students must complete the radiation sciences professional program at the University of Iowa. Registered radiologic technologists interested in earning the degree by distance education should see RT to B.S. (Online) in this section of the Catalog.

Admission to the radiation sciences major is competitive and selective; acceptance into a professional program or the major is not guaranteed. Students who wish to enter the major must first be admitted to the University of Iowa as College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (CLAS) students with a radiation sciences interest. As CLAS students, they must apply to the radiation sciences professional program of their choice by January 15 of the year in which they wish to enter; see Application/Admission Process on the Radiation Sciences Program website. Accepted students enter the professional program, the radiation sciences major, and the Carver College of Medicine the following fall semester.

Applicants for admission to the University of Iowa whose first language is not English are strongly encouraged to complete the University of Iowa English Proficiency Evaluation and satisfy the University's English Proficiency Requirements before they apply to a professional program. Students must have permission to register for a full academic load before they may be admitted to a radiation sciences professional program.

The radiation sciences major requires students to complete a minimum of two years of a high school world language prior to admission.

For additional information on UI admission requirements, contact the University's Office of Admissions.

First-year and transfer applicants who are admitted to CLAS as radiation sciences interest students must complete all courses that are prerequisite to the radiation sciences major (including approved transfer equivalents) by June 1 before they may begin one of the radiation sciences professional programs and enter the major. Prerequisite courses vary slightly depending on which professional program a student wishes to enter.

Students who have declared a radiation sciences interest but have not yet applied and been accepted to a professional program are advised at the University's Academic Advising Center. After they have been accepted to a professional program, they are advised by the Radiation Sciences Program.

Upon successful completion of the professional program, students are eligible to apply for national certification exams for their program's specialty area(s). Once they have completed the professional program and all other requirements for graduation, they are granted a Bachelor of Science degree.

The Bachelor of Science with a major in radiation sciences requires the following work.

Prerequisites to the Radiation Sciences Major

Students must complete the following prerequisite courses (25-27 s.h.) before they may enter the program and the major. Students who wish to enter the radiation therapy professional program must complete a total of 60 s.h. of college course work, including the following prerequisites, before they may enter the program and the major.

Rhetoric
RHET:1030Rhetoric4
Anatomy
One of these:
ACB:1199Human Anatomy and Basic Physiology for Radiation Science4
ACB:3110Principles of Human Anatomy3
ACB:3113Human Anatomy Online4
HHP:1100Human Anatomy3
Natural Sciences
One of these (diagnostic medical sonography and radiation therapy programs require PHYS:1400 or PHYS:1511):
BIOL:1140Human Biology4
CHEM:1070General Chemistry I3
CHEM:1110Principles of Chemistry I4
HHP:1300Fundamentals of Human Physiology3
HHP:3500Human Physiology3
PHYS:1400Basic Physics3-4
PHYS:1511College Physics I4
Quantitative or Formal Reasoning
One of these:
MATH:1020Elementary Functions4
MATH:1440Mathematics for the Biological Sciences4
Psychology
PSY:1001Elementary Psychology3
Medical Terminology
CLSA:3750Medical and Technical Terminology2
Culture, Society, and the Arts
Two courses for 3 s.h. each in two of these areas:
Historical Perspectives
International and Global Issues
Literary, Visual, and Performing Arts
Values, Society, and Diversity

See General Education Program (College of Liberal Arts and Sciences) in the Catalog for approved courses in the culture, society, and arts areas listed above.

Recommended Pre-Major Work

The Radiation Sciences Program recommends that before students submit an application to a radiation sciences professional program and the major, they job-shadow a professional who works in their area of interest, gain hands-on patient care experience, and complete the following additional preparatory courses.

This course:
RSP:1100Introduction to the Radiation Sciences1
One of these:
CS:1020Principles of Computing3
MSCI:1500Business Computing Essentials2
One of these:
STAT:1020Elementary Statistics and Inference3
STAT:3510Biostatistics3
STAT:4143Introduction to Statistical Methods3
For students interested in entering the radiation therapy professional program, one of these sequences:
CHEM:1070 & CHEM:1080General Chemistry I-II6
CHEM:1110 & CHEM:1120Principles of Chemistry I-II8

Electives

In order to earn the minimum of 120 s.h. required for graduation, students may need to complete elective course work in addition to the prerequisite course work listed above and one of the professional programs in medical imaging. They should plan their elective courses in consultation with their advisor.

Radiation Sciences Professional Programs

Students must complete one of the following on-campus radiation sciences professional programs at University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics:

  • radiologic technology and computed tomography;
  • radiologic technology and magnetic resonance imaging;
  • radiologic technology and cardiovascular interventional;
  • diagnostic medical sonography and general and vascular;
  • diagnostic medical sonography and cardiac and vascular; or
  • radiation therapy. 

Each program offers modality-specific didactic and supervised clinical education courses. Graduates of the professional programs and associated internships are eligible to apply for one or more certification exams.

The radiologic technology programs and diagnostic medical sonography programs last three years, and the radiation therapy program lasts two years. Each program begins in fall.

Students must apply to the program of their choice by January 15 of the year in which they intend to enter the program.

Admission to all radiation sciences professional programs is competitive; each program accepts a limited number of students and acceptance is not guaranteed. In addition to the prerequisite courses listed above, students must have earned a cumulative college g.p.a. of at least 2.50 prior to professional program admission.

A diagnostic medical sonographer is a skilled professional who uses high-frequency sound wave equipment to create diagnostic images and data that assist health care professionals in their diagnosis of patients with disease. Ultrasound imaging is used on many parts of the body, including the abdomen, heart, blood vessels, and the developing fetus of a pregnant woman. When determining normal and abnormal findings, the sonographer must demonstrate sectional anatomy through transducer manipulation. The sonographer uses independent judgment in recognizing the need to extend the scope of the study according to the diagnostic findings. The sonographer spends extended time with the patient obtaining a thorough history of symptoms, explaining the exam, answering questions, and performing the exam.

Each of the radiation sciences diagnostic medical sonography (DMS) degree tracks consist of two professional programs—DMS and general and vascular sonography or DMS and cardiac and vascular sonography. Each of these three-year programs is selective and competitive; acceptance is not guaranteed. Students must satisfy all UI admission requirements, complete all prerequisites, and be accepted into the diagnostic medical sonography professional program following an application and selection process; see Diagnostic Medical Sonography Tracks on the Radiation Sciences Program website.

Diagnostic Medical Sonography and General and Vascular Sonography

The diagnostic medical sonography program in general and vascular sonography provides a multispecialty education in obstetrical, abdominal, and vascular sonography (ultrasound imaging). Students learn about sonographic imaging and evaluation, hemodynamics and Doppler evaluation, sonography equipment, sectional anatomy, pathology, patient care, medical ethics, and quality assurance methods. They become proficient in using sonographic imaging equipment and in performing obstetrical and gynecological, abdominal, and vascular sonographic procedures, including invasive procedures, emergency exams, and 3-D imaging. They also participate in supervised clinical education. Elective courses are available in pediatric and breast sonography.

Upon completing the program, graduates are eligible to apply for the national certification exams in diagnostic medical sonography in the specialty areas of obstetrics and gynecology, abdomen, and vascular technology.

Students typically apply to this three-year program during their first year and begin it in fall of their sophomore year. Application deadline is January 15.  Eight students are accepted into this track each year.

Plan of Study

Plan of Study Grid
Second Year
FallHours
RSP:2110 Pathology for Radiation Sciences 2
RSP:2120 Patient Care for the Radiation Sciences 3
RSCI:4110 Vascular Anatomy (online) 3
Recommended:  
Elementary Statistics and Inference (3 s.h.)  
Principles of Computing (2-3 s.h.)
or Business Computing Essentials
 
 Hours8
Spring
RSP:3210 Medical Ethics and Law 2
RSCT:4100 Sectional Anatomy for Imaging Sciences (online) 3
RSCI:4130 Electrocardiogram and Hemodynamics (online) 3
RSMS:3110 Foundations of Sonography 3
RSMS:3111 Foundations of Sonography Lab 1
RSMS:3115 Diagnostic Medical Sonography Clinical Internship I 2
 Hours14
Third Year
Fall
RSMS:3120 Abdominal Sonography I 3
RSMS:3121 Abdominal Sonography I Lab 1
RSMS:3130 Obstetrical and Gynecological Sonography I 3
RSMS:3131 Obstetrical and Gynecological Sonography I Lab 1
RSMS:3140 Vascular Sonography I 3
RSMS:3141 Vascular Sonography I Lab 1
 Hours12
Spring
RSMS:3230 Sonography Principles, Physics, and Instrumentation 3
RSMS:3231 Sonography Principles, Physics, and Instrumentation Lab 1
RSMS:3240 Abdominal Sonography II 3
RSMS:3250 Obstetrical and Gynecological Sonography II 3
RSMS:3270 Vascular Sonography II 3
RSMS:3215 Diagnostic Medical Sonography Clinical Internship II 3
 Hours16
Summer
RSMS:3325 Abdominal Sonography II Lab 1
RSMS:3376 Vascular Sonography II Lab 1
RSMS:3315 Diagnostic Medical Sonography Clinical Internship III 4
Recommended:  
Breast Sonography (2 s.h., online elective)  
Pediatric Sonography (3 s.h., online elective)  
 Hours6
Fourth Year
Fall
RSMS:4110 Advanced Sonography 3
RSMS:4111 Advanced Sonography Lab 1
RSMS:4115 Diagnostic Medical Sonography Clinical Internship IV 5
RSP:4110 Research Methodology for Radiation Sciences 3
 Hours12
Spring
RSP:3220 Radiation Sciences Quality Management and Health Care Administration (online) 2
RSMS:4220 Multidisciplinary Capstone Seminar 3
RSMS:4215 Diagnostic Medical Sonography Clinical Internship V 5
Elective (if needed)  
 Hours10
 Total Hours78

Diagnostic Medical Sonography and Cardiac and Vascular Sonography

The diagnostic medical sonography program in cardiac and vascular sonography provides a multispecialty education in cardiac (echocardiography) and vascular sonography (ultrasound imaging). Students learn about sonographic imaging and evaluation, hemodynamics and Doppler evaluation, sonography equipment, sectional anatomy, pathology, patient care, medical ethics, and quality assurance methods. They become proficient in using sonographic imaging equipment and in performing cardiac and vascular sonographic procedures, including invasive procedures, emergency exams, and 3-D imaging. They also participate in supervised clinical education.

Upon completing the program, graduates are eligible to apply for the national certification exams in diagnostic medical sonography in the specialty areas of cardiac (echocardiography) and vascular technology.

Students typically apply to this three-year program during their first year and begin it in fall of their sophomore year. Application deadline is January 15.  Four students are accepted into this track each year.

Plan of Study

Plan of Study Grid
Second Year
FallHours
RSP:2110 Pathology for Radiation Sciences 2
RSP:2120 Patient Care for the Radiation Sciences 3
RSCI:4110 Vascular Anatomy (online) 3
Recommended:  
Elementary Statistics and Inference (3 s.h., elective credit)  
Principles of Computing (2-3 s.h., elective credit)
or Business Computing Essentials
 
 Hours8
Spring
RSP:3210 Medical Ethics and Law 2
RSCT:4100 Sectional Anatomy for Imaging Sciences (online) 3
RSCI:4130 Electrocardiogram and Hemodynamics (online) 3
RSMS:3110 Foundations of Sonography 3
RSMS:3111 Foundations of Sonography Lab 1
RSMS:3115 Diagnostic Medical Sonography Clinical Internship I 2
 Hours14
Third Year
Fall
RSMS:3100 Cardiac Sonography I 3
RSMS:3101 Cardiac Sonography I Lab 1
RSMS:3150 Cardiac Physiology and Hemodynamics 3
RSMS:3140 Vascular Sonography I 3
RSMS:3141 Vascular Sonography I Lab 1
Electives (if needed)  
 Hours11
Spring
RSMS:3230 Sonography Principles, Physics, and Instrumentation 3
RSMS:3231 Sonography Principles, Physics, and Instrumentation Lab 1
RSMS:3205 Cardiac Sonography II 3
RSMS:3206 Cardiac Sonography II Lab 1
RSMS:3270 Vascular Sonography II 3
RSMS:3215 Diagnostic Medical Sonography Clinical Internship II 3
 Hours14
Summer
RSMS:3376 Vascular Sonography II Lab 1
RSMS:3315 Diagnostic Medical Sonography Clinical Internship III 4
 Hours5
Fourth Year
Fall
RSMS:4110 Advanced Sonography 3
RSMS:4111 Advanced Sonography Lab 1
RSMS:4120 Advanced Cardiac Sonography 3
RSMS:4121 Advanced Cardiac Sonography Lab 1
RSMS:4115 Diagnostic Medical Sonography Clinical Internship IV 5
RSP:4110 Research Methodology for Radiation Sciences 3
 Hours16
Spring
RSP:3220 Radiation Sciences Quality Management and Health Care Administration (online) 2
RSMS:4220 Multidisciplinary Capstone Seminar 3
RSMS:4215 Diagnostic Medical Sonography Clinical Internship V 5
Electives (if needed)  
 Hours10
 Total Hours78

A radiologic technologist is a professional, qualified by education and clinical experience, who provides radiological (x-ray) services using a variety of exams and procedures. While utilizing excellent patient care skills, the technologist operates radiological equipment so that optimum radiographic quality is achieved with the minimum radiation exposure to the patient. Radiographers are employed primarily in hospitals, clinics, and doctors' offices, where they work closely with other members of the health care team to help diagnose and treat patients.

Each of the radiation sciences radiologic technology (RT) degree tracks consist of three professional programs—RT and computed tomography (CT), RT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or RT and cardiovascular interventional (CVI). Each of these three-year programs is selective and competitive; acceptance is not guaranteed. Students must satisfy all UI admission requirements, complete all prerequisites, and be accepted into the radiologic technology professional program following an application and selection process; see Radiologic Technology Tracks on the Radiation Sciences Program website.

Radiologic Technology and Computed Tomography

The radiologic technology component of this program provides education in pathology, radiation biology, radiation protection, patient care, and ethics. Students learn about radiographic procedures, imaging, and evaluation. They become acquainted with imaging equipment, study quality assurance, and participate in supervised clinical education in radiography and computed tomography (CT). The computed tomography component concentrates on sectional anatomy, single and multislice CT, electron beam CT, physiologic and 3-D imaging, CT simulation, physics and imaging, and procedures and pathology.

Upon completing the program, graduates are eligible to apply for the national certification exams in radiography and computed tomography.

Students typically apply to this three-year program during their first year and begin it in fall of their sophomore year. Application deadline is January 15.  Six students are accepted into this track each year.

Plan of Study

Plan of Study Grid
Second Year
FallHours
RSRT:2110 Radiographic Procedures and Analysis I 4
RSRT:2120 Radiologic Technology Clinical Internship I 1
RSP:2110 Pathology for Radiation Sciences 2
RSP:2120 Patient Care for the Radiation Sciences 3
RSP:3130 Radiation Safety and Radiobiology 2
 Hours12
Spring
RSRT:2215 Radiographic Procedures and Analysis II 7
RSRT:2225 Radiologic Technology Clinical Internship II 4
RSP:3210 Medical Ethics and Law 2
 Hours13
Summer
RSRT:2325 Radiologic Technology Clinical Internship III 3
RSCT:4100 Sectional Anatomy for Imaging Sciences (online) 3
 Hours6
Third Year
Fall
RSRT:3115 Radiographic Procedures and Analysis III 4
RSRT:3125 Radiologic Technology Clinical Internship IV 4
RSRT:3140 Radiographic and Digital Imaging 5
 Hours13
Spring
RSRT:3210 Radiographic and Digital Quality Control Lab 1
RSRT:3215 Radiographic Procedures IV 1
RSRT:3225 Radiologic Technology Clinical Internship V 3
RSRT:3230 Radiographic Physics and Imaging Equipment 4
RSCI:4130 Electrocardiogram and Hemodynamics (online) 3
 Hours12
Summer
RSRT:3325 Radiologic Technology Clinical Internship VI 2
RSCI:4110 Vascular Anatomy (online) 3
RSCT:4105 Computed Tomography Clinical Internship I 1
 Hours6
Fourth Year
Fall
RSRT:4125 Radiologic Technology Clinical Internship VII 1
RSCT:4115 Computed Tomography Clinical Internship II 3
RSCT:4120 Computed Tomography Procedures I (online) 3
RSCT:4130 Computed Tomography Physical Principles and QC (online) 4
RSP:4110 Research Methodology for Radiation Sciences 3
 Hours14
Spring
RSRT:4225 Radiologic Technology Clinical Internship VIII 1
RSCT:4110 CT/MRI Pathology (online) 3
RSCT:4125 Computed Tomography Procedures II (online) 3
RSCT:4215 Computed Tomography Clinical Internship III 3
RSP:3220 Radiation Sciences Quality Management and Health Care Administration (online) 2
 Hours12
 Total Hours88

Radiologic Technology and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

The radiologic technology component of this program provides education in pathology, radiation biology, radiation protection, patient care, and ethics. Students learn about radiographic procedures, imaging, and evaluation. They become acquainted with imaging equipment, study quality assurance, and participate in supervised clinical education in radiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The magnetic resonance imaging component offers intensive study and practice in MRI, including patient care procedures, pathophysiology, physics, sectional anatomy, and instrumentation.

Upon completing the program, graduates are eligible to apply for the national certification exams in radiography and magnetic resonance imaging.

Students typically apply to this three-year program during their first year and begin it in fall of their sophomore year. Application deadline is January 15.  Six students are accepted into this track each year.

Plan of Study

Plan of Study Grid
Second Year
FallHours
RSRT:2110 Radiographic Procedures and Analysis I 4
RSRT:2120 Radiologic Technology Clinical Internship I 1
RSP:2110 Pathology for Radiation Sciences 2
RSP:2120 Patient Care for the Radiation Sciences 3
RSP:3130 Radiation Safety and Radiobiology 2
 Hours12
Spring
RSRT:2215 Radiographic Procedures and Analysis II 7
RSRT:2225 Radiologic Technology Clinical Internship II 4
RSP:3210 Medical Ethics and Law 2
 Hours13
Summer
RSRT:2325 Radiologic Technology Clinical Internship III 3
RSCT:4100 Sectional Anatomy for Imaging Sciences (online) 3
 Hours6
Third Year
Fall
RSRT:3115 Radiographic Procedures and Analysis III 4
RSRT:3125 Radiologic Technology Clinical Internship IV 4
RSRT:3140 Radiographic and Digital Imaging 5
 Hours13
Spring
RSRT:3210 Radiographic and Digital Quality Control Lab 1
RSRT:3215 Radiographic Procedures IV 1
RSRT:3225 Radiologic Technology Clinical Internship V 3
RSRT:3230 Radiographic Physics and Imaging Equipment 4
RSCT:4110 CT/MRI Pathology (online) 3
RSMR:4110 Fundamentals for the MRI Technologist (online) 3
 Hours15
Summer
RSRT:3325 Radiologic Technology Clinical Internship VI 2
RSCI:4110 Vascular Anatomy (online) 3
RSMR:4160 MRI Clinical Internship I 2
 Hours7
Fourth Year
Fall
RSRT:4125 Radiologic Technology Clinical Internship VII 1
RSP:4110 Research Methodology for Radiation Sciences 3
RSMR:4120 MRI Procedures I (online) 4
RSMR:4140 MRI Acquisition and Principles I (online) 3
RSMR:4170 MRI Clinical Internship II 3
 Hours14
Spring
RSRT:4225 Radiologic Technology Clinical Internship VIII 1
RSP:3220 Radiation Sciences Quality Management and Health Care Administration (online) 2
RSMR:4130 MRI Procedures II (online) 3
RSMR:4150 MRI Acquisition and Principles II (online) 3
RSMR:4175 MRI Clinical Internship III 4
 Hours13
 Total Hours93

Radiologic Technology and Cardiovascular Interventional

The radiologic technology component of this program provides education in pathology, radiation biology, radiation protection, patient care, and ethics. Students learn about radiographic procedures, imaging, and evaluation. They become acquainted with imaging equipment, study quality assurance, and participate in supervised clinical education in radiography, cardiac interventional, and peripheral/neurological interventional. The cardiovascular interventional component concentrates on imaging equipment; pharmacology; sterile techniques; cardiac monitoring; vascular anatomy and physiology; cardiovascular, peripheral, and neurological procedures and pathology; therapeutic intervention techniques; and digital angiography.

Upon completing the program, graduates are eligible to apply for the national certification exams in radiography, vascular interventional technology, and cardiac interventional technology.

Students typically apply to this three-year program during their first year and begin it in fall of their sophomore year. Application deadline is January 15.  Two students are accepted into this track each year.

Plan of Study

Plan of Study Grid
Second Year
FallHours
RSRT:2110 Radiographic Procedures and Analysis I 4
RSRT:2120 Radiologic Technology Clinical Internship I 1
RSP:2110 Pathology for Radiation Sciences 2
RSP:2120 Patient Care for the Radiation Sciences 3
RSP:3130 Radiation Safety and Radiobiology 2
 Hours12
Spring
RSRT:2215 Radiographic Procedures and Analysis II 7
RSRT:2225 Radiologic Technology Clinical Internship II 4
RSP:3210 Medical Ethics and Law 2
 Hours13
Summer
RSRT:2325 Radiologic Technology Clinical Internship III 3
RSCT:4100 Sectional Anatomy for Imaging Sciences (online) 3
 Hours6
Third Year
Fall
RSRT:3115 Radiographic Procedures and Analysis III 4
RSRT:3125 Radiologic Technology Clinical Internship IV 4
RSRT:3140 Radiographic and Digital Imaging 5
 Hours13
Spring
RSRT:3210 Radiographic and Digital Quality Control Lab 1
RSRT:3215 Radiographic Procedures IV 1
RSRT:3230 Radiographic Physics and Imaging Equipment 4
RSRT:3225 Radiologic Technology Clinical Internship V 3
RSCI:4110 Vascular Anatomy (online) 3
 Hours12
Summer
RSRT:3325 Radiologic Technology Clinical Internship VI 2
RSCI:4120 CVI Principles (online) 4
RSCI:4190 CVI Clinical Internship (online) 2
 Hours8
Fourth Year
Fall
RSRT:4125 Radiologic Technology Clinical Internship VII 1
RSP:4110 Research Methodology for Radiation Sciences 3
RSCI:4140 CVI Peripheral Procedures and Pathology (online) 3
RSCI:4150 CVI Neurology and Nonvascular Procedures and Pathology (online) 3
RSCI:4180 Vascular Interventional Clinical Internship 4
 Hours14
Spring
RSRT:4225 Radiologic Technology Clinical Internship VIII 1
RSCI:4130 Electrocardiogram and Hemodynamics (online) 3
RSCI:4160 CVI Cardiac Procedures and Pathology (online) 4
RSCI:4170 Cardiac Interventional Clinical Internship 4
RSP:3220 Radiation Sciences Quality Management and Health Care Administration (online) 2
 Hours14
 Total Hours92

A radiation therapist functions as a member of a team with physicians (radiation oncologist), physicists, dosimetrists, and nurses to provide treatment using ionizing radiation sources for patients with malignant and some benign diseases. The radiation therapist is responsible for the daily delivery of the prescribed treatment according to the treatment plan prepared by their physician in consultation with the medical physicist. The therapist works with the oncology nurse in the daily assessment of the patient's status and needs during their course of therapy. Radiation therapists are employed in radiation therapy facilities located in hospitals and freestanding centers.

Students completing the Radiation Therapy Program are trained to deliver therapeutic radiation. This two-year program is selective and competitive; acceptance is not guaranteed. Students must satisfy all UI admission requirements, complete all prerequisites, and be accepted into the Radiation Therapy professional program following an application and selection process; see Radiation Therapy Track on the Radiation Sciences Program website. Training is provided by University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics faculty in the Department of Radiation Oncology, with a hands-on component under the close guidance of licensed radiation therapists. 

Radiation Therapy

The radiation therapy professional program teaches theory and techniques of radiation therapy technology, with emphasis on competence in areas of oncology treatment planning, treatment delivery, dosimetry, and use of megavoltage radiation-producing equipment to administer treatment. Students participate in clinical education in radiation therapy. Radiation therapy students also complete course work in sectional anatomy and computed tomography (CT)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pathology. Students have the option of completing course work in CT procedures and physics, MRI fundamentals and acquisition, or courses in both modalities.

Upon completing the program, graduates are eligible to apply for the national certification exam in radiation therapy. Students will have completed the course work but not the clinical component to be eligible to apply for the national certification exam in computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging.

Students typically apply to this two-year program during their sophomore year and begin it in fall of their junior year. Application deadline is January 15.  Seven students are accepted into this track each year.

Plan of Study

The second year schedule is recommended.

Plan of Study Grid
Second Year
FallHours
CHEM:1070
General Chemistry I
or Principles of Chemistry I
3-4
PHYS:1400
Basic Physics
or College Physics I
3-4
CS:1020
Principles of Computing
or Business Computing Essentials
2-3
Electives 4
 Hours12-15
Spring
CHEM:1080
General Chemistry II
or Principles of Chemistry II
3-4
PHYS:1512 College Physics II 4
STAT:1020
Elementary Statistics and Inference
or Biostatistics
or Introduction to Statistical Methods
3
Electives 2
 Hours12-13
 Total Hours24-28

Upon acceptance into the radiation therapy professional program, students will complete required courses and internships during their third and fourth years.

Plan of Study Grid
Third Year
FallHours
RSP:2120 Patient Care for the Radiation Sciences 3
RSP:3130 Radiation Safety and Radiobiology 2
RSP:2110 Pathology for Radiation Sciences 2
RSTH:3110 Medical Physics I 2
RSTH:3100 Introduction to Radiation Therapy 2
RSTH:3120 Radiation Therapy Clinical Internship I 3
 Hours14
Spring
RSP:3210 Medical Ethics and Law 2
RSTH:3205 Principles of Radiation Therapy I 2
RSTH:3215 Medical Physics II 2
RSTH:3225 Radiation Therapy Clinical Internship II 3
RSCT:4100 Sectional Anatomy for Imaging Sciences (online) 3
 Hours12
 Total Hours26

Students choose from three options for course work in their last year of the program, starting with the summer before the fourth year.

Option 1 (MRI Course Work)

Plan of Study Grid
Third Year
SummerHours
RSTH:3325 Radiation Therapy Clinical Internship III 6
RSMR:4110 Fundamentals for the MRI Technologist (online) 3
Recommended:  
Vascular Anatomy (3 s.h., online elective)  
 Hours9
Fourth Year
Fall
RSMR:4140 MRI Acquisition and Principles I (online) 3
RSTH:4105 Principles of Radiation Therapy II 2
RSTH:4125 Radiation Therapy Clinical Internship IV 4
RSP:4110 Research Methodology for Radiation Sciences 3
Recommended:  
MRI Procedures I (4 s.h., online elective)  
 Hours12
Spring
RSTH:4230 Radiation Therapy Capstone 3
RSTH:4225 Radiation Therapy Clinical Internship V 4
RSCT:4110 CT/MRI Pathology (online) 3
RSP:3220 Radiation Sciences Quality Management and Health Care Administration (online) 2
Recommended:  
MRI Procedures II (3 s.h., online elective)  
MRI Acquisition and Principles II (3 s.h., online elective)  
 Hours12
 Total Hours33

Option 2 (CT Course Work)

Plan of Study Grid
Third Year
SummerHours
RSTH:3325 Radiation Therapy Clinical Internship III 6
Recommended:  
Vascular Anatomy (3 s.h., online elective)  
 Hours6
Fourth Year
Fall
RSCT:4120 Computed Tomography Procedures I (online) 3
RSCT:4130 Computed Tomography Physical Principles and QC (online) 4
RSTH:4105 Principles of Radiation Therapy II 2
RSTH:4125 Radiation Therapy Clinical Internship IV 4
RSP:4110 Research Methodology for Radiation Sciences 3
 Hours16
Spring
RSTH:4230 Radiation Therapy Capstone 3
RSTH:4225 Radiation Therapy Clinical Internship V 4
RSCT:4110 CT/MRI Pathology (online) 3
RSP:3220 Radiation Sciences Quality Management and Health Care Administration (online) 2
Recommended:  
Computed Tomography Procedures II (3 s.h., online elective)  
 Hours12
 Total Hours34

Option 3 (CT and MRI Course Work)

Plan of Study Grid
Third Year
SummerHours
RSTH:3325 Radiation Therapy Clinical Internship III 6
RSMR:4110 Fundamentals for the MRI Technologist (online) 3
Recommended:  
Vascular Anatomy (3 s.h., online elective)  
 Hours9
Fourth Year
Fall
RSCT:4130 Computed Tomography Physical Principles and QC (online) 4
RSTH:4105 Principles of Radiation Therapy II 2
RSTH:4125 Radiation Therapy Clinical Internship IV 4
RSP:4110 Research Methodology for Radiation Sciences 3
Recommended:  
Computed Tomography Procedures I (3 s.h., online elective)  
MRI Acquisition and Principles I (3 s.h., online elective)  
MRI Procedures I (4 s.h., online elective)  
 Hours13
Spring
RSTH:4230 Radiation Therapy Capstone 3
RSTH:4225 Radiation Therapy Clinical Internship V 4
RSCT:4110 CT/MRI Pathology (online) 3
RSP:3220 Radiation Sciences Quality Management and Health Care Administration (online) 2
Recommended:  
Computed Tomography Procedures II (3 s.h., online elective)  
MRI Procedures II (3 s.h., online elective)  
MRI Acquisition and Principles II (3 s.h., online elective)  
 Hours12
 Total Hours34

The RT to B.S. is an online program designed for registered radiologic technologists who wish to earn a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in radiation sciences by distance education. The program requires a minimum of 120 s.h. Students who successfully complete a radiologic technology (RT) program are awarded 60 s.h. of credit. They also are awarded credit for equivalent course work that is prerequisite to entering the major. Upon admission to the major, students complete an online modality, advanced courses, and electives for graduation.

Students choose one of three online modalities: cardiovascular interventional (CVI), computed tomography (CT), or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The modalities do not require an internship.

In order to be admitted to the radiation sciences major, students must pass the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) radiography board certification exam. They also must have completed all course work prerequisite to entering the major with a g.p.a. of at least 2.50, not including RT program courses. Students may count approved transfer credit toward the required prerequisites; learn more by visiting Transfer Courses in MyUI.

Applicants for admission to the University of Iowa whose first language is not English are strongly encouraged to complete the University of Iowa English Proficiency Evaluation and satisfy the University's English Proficiency Requirements.

The radiation sciences major requires students to complete a minimum of two years of a high school world language prior to admission.

For additional information on UI admission requirements, contact the University's Office of Admissions.

Prerequisites to the Radiation Sciences Major

Students must complete the following prerequisite courses (25-27 s.h.) before they may enter the radiation sciences major.

Rhetoric
RHET:1030Rhetoric4
Anatomy
One of these:
ACB:1199Human Anatomy and Basic Physiology for Radiation Science4
ACB:3110Principles of Human Anatomy3
ACB:3113Human Anatomy Online4
HHP:1100Human Anatomy3
Natural Sciences
One of these:
BIOL:1140Human Biology4
CHEM:1070General Chemistry I3
CHEM:1110Principles of Chemistry I4
HHP:1300Fundamentals of Human Physiology3
HHP:3500Human Physiology3
PHYS:1400Basic Physics3-4
PHYS:1511College Physics I4
Quantitative or Formal Reasoning
One of these:
MATH:1020Elementary Functions4
MATH:1440Mathematics for the Biological Sciences4
Psychology
PSY:1001Elementary Psychology3
Medical Terminology
CLSA:3750Medical and Technical Terminology2
Culture, Society, and the Arts
Two courses for 3 s.h. each in two of these areas:
Historical Perspectives
International and Global Issues
Literary, Visual, and Performing Arts
Values, Society, and Diversity

See General Education Program (College of Liberal Arts and Sciences) in the Catalog for approved courses in the culture, society, and arts areas listed above.

Once students are admitted to the Carver College of Medicine and the radiation sciences major, they must at least complete their final consecutive 30 s.h. at the University of Iowa, including an online modality (22-25 s.h.), two advanced courses (6 s.h.), and sufficient elective course work to complete the minimum 120 s.h. and the final consecutive 30 s.h. required for graduation.

Online Modality

Students complete one of the following three online modalities.

Cardiovascular Interventional

The cardiovascular interventional online modality requires the following course work (total of 23 s.h.).

RSCI:4110Vascular Anatomy3
RSCI:4120CVI Principles4
RSCI:4130Electrocardiogram and Hemodynamics3
RSCI:4140CVI Peripheral Procedures and Pathology3
RSCI:4150CVI Neurology and Nonvascular Procedures and Pathology3
RSCI:4160CVI Cardiac Procedures and Pathology4
RSCT:4100Sectional Anatomy for Imaging Sciences3

Computed Tomography

The computed tomography online modality requires the following course work (total of 22 s.h.).

RSCI:4110Vascular Anatomy3
RSCI:4130Electrocardiogram and Hemodynamics3
RSCT:4100Sectional Anatomy for Imaging Sciences3
RSCT:4110CT/MRI Pathology3
RSCT:4120Computed Tomography Procedures I3
RSCT:4125Computed Tomography Procedures II3
RSCT:4130Computed Tomography Physical Principles and QC4

Magnetic Resonance Imaging

The magnetic resonance imaging online modality requires the following course work (total of 25 s.h.).

RSCI:4110Vascular Anatomy3
RSCT:4100Sectional Anatomy for Imaging Sciences3
RSCT:4110CT/MRI Pathology3
RSMR:4110Fundamentals for the MRI Technologist3
RSMR:4120MRI Procedures I4
RSMR:4130MRI Procedures II3
RSMR:4140MRI Acquisition and Principles I3
RSMR:4150MRI Acquisition and Principles II3

Course schedules can be found under "RT to BS Degree Requirements" on the Radiation Sciences Program website.

Advanced Courses

Management and Leadership
One of these:
COMM:1819Organizational Leadership3
MGMT:2100Introduction to Management3
MGMT:3500Nonprofit Organizational Effectiveness I3
Statistics
One of these:
STAT:1020Elementary Statistics and Inference3
STAT:4143Introduction to Statistical Methods3

Electives

Students choose elective course work to complete the minimum 120 s.h. required and the final consecutive 30 s.h. necessary to qualify for graduation.

The majority of radiation sciences graduates are employed shortly after graduation. Graduates generally find jobs in hospitals, clinics, imaging centers, and physicians’ offices. With experience, and sometimes additional education, they may find related jobs in management, sales, education, or as application specialists. Some students choose to continue their education in a master's, physician assistant, or other related medical program.

Most radiation sciences professionals with full-time jobs work 40 hours a week and may have holiday, weekend, evening, night, and on-call hours.

Students who complete Iowa's professional radiation sciences programs are eligible to apply for national certification exams administered by the appropriate agency in order to practice.

Licensure laws for radiographers, sonographers, and radiation therapists vary from state to state. Iowa is a licensing state, requiring radiographers to have a permit to practice. Passing the national exam is a criterion used to issue a permit to practice.

More information on radiation sciences careers and outcomes may be found on the Radiation Sciences Program website. The Pomerantz Career Center offers multiple resources to help students find jobs.