Learning Outcomes

Students will:

  • acquire breadth of knowledge about the field of art history through course work in a diversity of areas;
  • learn that art embodies historical, cultural, social, and political factors within a diverse range of national, international, and global cultures;
  • acquire critical skills in visual analysis and writing; and
  • develop and apply research skills.

The Bachelor of Arts with a major in art requires a minimum of 120 s.h., including at least 39 s.h. of work for the major. Students must maintain a g.p.a. of at least 2.00 in all courses for the major and in all UI courses for the major. They also must complete the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences GE CLAS Core.

The major provides a foundation in art history as well as an understanding of the formal traditions and contemporary practices in studio art. Students take courses in the school's studio art programs, including animation, ceramics, graphic design, three-dimensional (3-D) design, drawing, intermedia, jewelry and metal arts, painting, photography, printmaking, and sculpture.

Students may count a maximum of 56 s.h. earned in art and art history courses toward the degree; they must earn at least 64 s.h. of credit in courses outside the School of Art and Art History in order to graduate.

B.A. students with a double major in the school (e.g., a major in art and a major in art history) or a major and a minor in the school (e.g., a major in art and a minor in art history) must earn at least 56 s.h. of credit in courses outside the School of Art and Art History in order to graduate.

Students majoring in art begin their study in the Bachelor of Arts program. Those interested in pursuing concentrated work in a specific studio art discipline may apply for admission to the Bachelor of Fine Arts program through a process called "clearance," in which the faculty evaluates a student's readiness for B.F.A. study. Clearance usually takes place during the third year, but it may be conducted earlier or later, depending on the student's readiness.

Students interested in teaching art in elementary and/or secondary schools may apply to the art education program; see "Teacher Licensure" below.

Students who complete an elements course and decide to pursue either major or minor work in the area of studio art may elect to substitute the elements course for the corresponding discipline beginning or introductory studio arts course, such as ARTS:1080 Elements of Sculpture for SCLP:2810 Undergraduate Sculpture I.

The B.A. with a major in art requires the following course work. Not all courses are offered every semester, including required courses. When planning their course work, students should consult their advisors and MyUI to determine when specific courses will be offered.

Four Art History Courses12
Two Foundational Studio Art Courses6
Two Studio Art 3-D Courses6
Two Studio Art 2-D Courses6
Two Upper-Level Studio Art Courses6
Required Electives3
Total Hours39

Art History

Two of these:
ARTH:1040Arts of Africa3
ARTH:1050From Cave Paintings to Cathedrals: Survey of Western Art I3
ARTH:1060From Mona Lisa to Modernism: Survey of Western Art II3
ARTH:1070Asian Art and Culture3
ARTH:1095American Indian Art3
And:
Two art history courses not in the list above, excluding ARTH:1000, ARTH:1080, ARTH:2975, ARTH:3985, ARTH:3995, and ARTH:49996

Foundational Studio Art

Studio art majors are required to complete ARTS:1510 Basic Drawing and ARTS:1520 Design Fundamentals by the end of their first academic year. Majors can enroll in one beginning or introductory studio arts course during the same semester they are enrolled in either ARTS:1510 or ARTS:1520.

Students may take introductory 3-D and 2-D courses while taking the foundational courses.

Both of these:
ARTS:1510Basic Drawing3
ARTS:1520Design Fundamentals3

Studio Art 3-D Courses

Two of these:
CERM:2010Exploring Forms in Clay I3
INTM:2710Introduction to Intermedia3
MTLS:2910Introduction to Jewelry and Metal Arts3
SCLP:2810Undergraduate Sculpture I3
TDSN:2210Problems in 3-D Design3

Studio Art 2-D Courses

Two of these:
ANIM:2125Introduction to Animation3
DRAW:2310Life Drawing I3
DSGN:2500Graphic Design I3
PHTO:2510Beginning Digital Photography3
PNTG:2410Painting I3
PRNT:2610Introduction to Printmaking3

Upper-Level Studio Art Courses

Students must take two upper-level studio art courses. They may take both upper-level courses in the same studio art discipline or one upper-level course in each of two disciplines. Any course beyond the introductory course in the discipline is considered upper level

Introductory courses include the following and do not count toward the upper-level studio arts courses requirement.

ANIM:2125Introduction to Animation3
CERM:2010Exploring Forms in Clay I3
DRAW:2310Life Drawing I3
DSGN:2500Graphic Design I3
INTM:2710Introduction to Intermedia3
MTLS:2910Introduction to Jewelry and Metal Arts3
PHTO:2510Beginning Digital Photography3
PNTG:2410Painting I3
PRNT:2610Introduction to Printmaking3
SCLP:2810Undergraduate Sculpture I3
TDSN:2210Problems in 3-D Design3

Required Electives

School of Art and Art History elective courses must bring the total credit for the major in art to a minimum of 39 s.h.

Transfer Students

Transfer students should contact the undergraduate academic advisors for information about transfer portfolio review and specific course work that satisfies the requirements for the major in art. Students may count a maximum of 12 s.h. of approved transfer credit toward their major.

Study Abroad

Students who wish to study abroad must meet with the undergraduate advisor before they depart in order to confirm approval of the courses they plan to take.

Students who take studio art courses abroad must bring their artwork back to campus and must present it in a portfolio review, which determines whether the work satisfies a requirement for their major. The portfolio review is not required if the study abroad course was taught by a School of Art and Art History faculty member who gave the student a grade for the course.

Students who plan to take art history courses abroad must present the course syllabus to their advisor well in advance of their departure. The head of the art history program determines whether the study abroad course is equivalent to a course required for the major; if it is, the student is credited with fulfilling the requirement once the course is completed with a passing grade.

Teacher Licensure

Majors interested in earning licensure to teach in elementary and/or secondary schools must complete the College of Education's Teacher Education Program (TEP) in addition to the requirements for the art major and all requirements for graduation with a B.A. degree. The TEP requires several College of Education courses and student teaching. Students must satisfy all degree requirements and complete TEP licensure before degree conferral. Contact the Office of Student Services in the College of Education for details.

Honors in the Major

Students have the opportunity to graduate with honors in the major. Honors students must maintain a cumulative University of Iowa g.p.a. of at least 3.33 and a g.p.a. of at least 3.50 in their major. They also must complete an application to graduate with honors in the major.

Students must complete a studio art project during the semester in which they plan to graduate. They must select a studio art faculty member willing to supervise their honors project; must display the completed project in a show; and must complete a title page, abstract, and CD of images for their project. They earn credit for the project by enrolling in ARTS:4190 Honors in Studio Art.

University of Iowa Honors Program

In addition to honors in the major, students have a variety of opportunities for honors study and activities through membership in the University of Iowa Honors Program. Visit Honors at Iowa to learn about the University's honors program.

Membership in the UI Honors Program is not required to earn honors in the art major.

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences GE CLAS Core requirements provide students with a broad foundation of knowledge and a focused practice of transferable skills necessary for a lifetime of learning.

GE CLAS Core courses are particularly valuable for students making the transition into the University of Iowa. They help students understand the academic expectations of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences while providing the knowledge and skills needed for more advanced work in the major.

All students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences who wish to earn an undergraduate degree—Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), Bachelor of Science (B.S.), Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.), or Bachelor of Music (B.M.)—must complete the requirements of the GE CLAS Core.

GE CLAS Core Areas and Requirements

The GE CLAS Core has 11 required areas, grouped into three categories. Students must fulfill the requirements in each GE CLAS Core area. The requirements below are for students who entered the University of Iowa during Summer 2017 or after. Students who entered during a previous semester are held to different requirements as indicated on a student's degree audit.

Communication and Literacy:

Natural, Quantitative, and Social Sciences:

Culture, Society, and the Arts:

Students may count transfer credit and/or credit by exam toward some GE CLAS Core requirements. See CLAS Core Policies for details regarding use of transfer credit, credit by exam, and other policies for how GE CLAS Core requirements may be fulfilled.

Communication and Literacy

Rhetoric

Rhetoric courses develop speaking, writing, listening, and critical reading skills and build competence in research, analysis, and argumentation.

All entering first-year students are required to complete RHET:1030 Rhetoric (4-5 s.h.). Because rhetorical skills lay the foundation for further study at the University, most students register for RHET:1030 during their first year at Iowa. Students in some majors, such as English or journalism and mass communication, enroll in RHET:1030 during their first semester.

Students who must enroll in English as a Second Language (ESL) courses as determined by their English proficiency evaluation must complete all ESL courses before they may register for RHET:1030 Rhetoric.

Students who have transfer credit in composition, speech, and argumentation but have not been granted an A.A. degree must complete the equivalent of RHET:1030 Rhetoric and often must take RHET:1040 Writing and Reading or RHET:1060 Speaking and Reading in addition to their transfer courses in composition and/or speech.

Each entering student's degree audit shows the course(s) that must be completed in order to fulfill the Rhetoric requirement.

The following courses are approved for the Rhetoric area.

RHET:1030Rhetoric4-5
RHET:1040Writing and Reading3
RHET:1060Speaking and Reading3

Transfer of Credit for Rhetoric

Transfer students who have been granted an Associate of Arts (A.A.) degree from an Iowa community college, Waldorf College in Iowa, or Black Hawk College in Illinois have satisfied the Rhetoric requirement.

Transfer credit for students without an A.A. degree is evaluated as follows:

  • transfer students who have completed composition I, composition II, and speech at another institution have satisfied the GE CLAS Core Rhetoric requirement of RHET:1030 Rhetoric;
  • transfer students who have completed only composition I must complete RHET:1030 Rhetoric at the University of Iowa;
  • transfer students who have completed composition I and speech must complete RHET:1040 Writing and Reading at the University of Iowa;
  • transfer students who have completed only speech must complete RHET:1040 Writing and Reading at the University of Iowa;
  • transfer students who have completed composition I and II or only composition II must complete RHET:1060 Speaking and Reading at the University of Iowa;
  • for transfer students who have completed any other course at another institution that may be equivalent to RHET:1030 Rhetoric, the University of Iowa Office of Admissions examines the content of the course and decides on equivalency based on the content of that course, conferring with the Department of Rhetoric on the correct equivalency, if necessary.

Interpretation of Literature

Courses in the Interpretation of Literature area focus on the major genres of literature (short and long fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama), improving students' abilities to read and analyze a variety of texts. Small group discussions in these courses challenge students to think critically, to share insights, and to listen thoughtfully to the arguments of others.

All students must complete at least 3 s.h. of course work in the Interpretation of Literature area. The following courses are approved for the area.

CL:1510/ASIA:1510Ghost Stories and Tales of the Weird in Pre-Modern Chinese Literature3
ENGL:1200The Interpretation of Literature3
FREN:1005Texts and Contexts: French-Speaking World3
FREN:1007Nature/Ecology French Philosophy and Fiction3
HONR:1885Reading the Ancient City3

World Languages

GE CLAS Core courses in World Languages provide speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills in a second language as well as knowledge of the cultures in which the language is spoken. To fulfill the GE CLAS Core requirement in World Languages, students may choose one of the following options:

complete four years of a single world language in high school; or

achieve the fourth level of proficiency in a world language by completing the appropriate sequence of courses offered at the University of Iowa; or

achieve the fourth level of proficiency by completing courses at another college or university or through study abroad; or

achieve an equivalent score on a related Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, or other approved college-level examination accepted by the University of Iowa and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (see Credit By Exam Options on the Office of Admissions website); or

earn an equivalent score on both a UI written placement test and on a UI oral proficiency exam in a language taught at the University of Iowa (see World Languages Placement Test (WLPT) on the New Student Services website); or

earn an equivalent score on a proficiency exam in a language that is not taught at the University of Iowa (see Proficiency Examinations for Languages Not Taught at UI on the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences website).

A fourth level of proficiency is equivalent to the successful completion of an intermediate II language course (or of a second-year second semester course, for example) as taught at the University of Iowa. Depending on a student's placement test results and the language taken, a student may need to take four semesters of a language, starting with a beginning course and ending with a second semester intermediate course. Other students may be able to start elsewhere in the language sequence and complete the GE World Language requirement by taking two or three courses. See "World Languages Placement Tests" under Placement Tests on the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences website.

Semester hours earned for these courses vary by language. Students should be sure to take the placement test for the language of interest and should be aware of the course sequence required to fulfill the GE requirement in World Languages for that particular language.

Once the World Languages requirement is completed, a student may earn up to an additional 8 s.h. of college credit while studying a world language. See Furthering Language Incentive Program (FLIP) on the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences website.

Students may use the following language course sequences to fulfill the World Languages requirement. To avoid duplication or regression, consult the appropriate language department before registering for courses.

American Sign Language

Courses in American Sign Language (ASL) are offered by the American Sign Language Program. The following sequence fulfills the GE CLAS Core World Languages requirement.

ASL:1001American Sign Language I4
ASL:1002American Sign Language II4
ASL:2001American Sign Language III4
ASL:2002American Sign Language IV4

Students with previous knowledge of American Sign Language should consult the ASL program for placement.

Arabic

Courses in Arabic are offered by the Department of French and Italian. The following sequence fulfills the GE CLAS Core World Languages requirement.

ARAB:1001Elementary Modern Standard Arabic I5
ARAB:1002Elementary Modern Standard Arabic II5
ARAB:2001Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic I5
ARAB:2002Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic II5

Students with previous knowledge of Arabic should consult the department for appropriate placement.

Chinese

Courses in Chinese are offered by the Department of Asian and Slavic Languages and Literatures. For students without previous knowledge of Chinese, the department recommends the following sequence to fulfill the GE CLAS Core World Languages requirement.

CHIN:1111First-Year Chinese: First Semester5
CHIN:1112First-Year Chinese: Second Semester5
CHIN:2101Second-Year Chinese: First Semester5
CHIN:2102Second-Year Chinese: Second Semester5

Students may use varied combinations of Chinese language courses approved to fulfill the GE CLAS Core World Languages requirement. Heritage learners and students who have studied Chinese abroad may be able to fulfill the requirement by substituting CHIN:2103 Accelerated Second-Year Chinese: First Semester and CHIN:2104 Accelerated Second-Year Chinese: Second Semester for CHIN:2101 and CHIN:2102. Consult the department for more information.

French

Courses in French are offered by the Department of French and Italian. For students without previous knowledge of French, the department recommends the following sequence to fulfill the GE CLAS Core World Languages requirement.

FREN:1001Elementary French I4-5
FREN:1002Elementary French II4-5
FREN:2001Intermediate French I5
FREN:2002Intermediate French II5

Students may use varied combinations of French language courses approved to fulfill the GE CLAS Core World Languages requirement. Those with previous knowledge of French may be able to fulfill the requirement by substituting FREN:1010 First-Year French Review for FREN:1001 and FREN:1002 in the sequence above. Some students may be evaluated as ready for FREN:2001 or FREN:2002. Consult the department for appropriate placement.

German

Courses in German are offered by the Department of German. For students without previous knowledge of German, the department recommends the following sequence to fulfill the GE CLAS Core World Languages requirement.

GRMN:1001Elementary German I4
GRMN:1002Elementary German II4
GRMN:2001Intermediate German I4
GRMN:2002Intermediate German II4

Students may use varied combinations of German language courses approved to fulfill the GE CLAS Core World Languages requirement. Those with previous knowledge of German may be able to fulfill the requirement by substituting GRMN:1010 First-Year German Review for GRMN:1001 and GRMN:1002 in the sequence above. Some students may be evaluated as ready for GRMN:2001 or GRMN:2002. Consult the department for appropriate placement.

The department also offers accelerated intensive courses, GRMN:1020 Intensive Elementary German and GRMN:2020 Intensive Intermediate German, which may be appropriate for students with strong language learning abilities or experience. The intensive courses may be combined with nonintensive courses to create other sequences that may be used to fulfill the GE CLAS Core World Languages requirement. Consult the department to identify an appropriate course sequence.

Greek

Courses in Greek are offered by the Department of Classics. Students without previous knowledge of Greek should fulfill the GE CLAS Core World Languages requirement with the following sequence.

CLSG:1001Classical and New Testament Greek I3-5
CLSG:1002Classical and New Testament Greek II3-5
CLSG:2001Second-Year Greek I3
CLSG:2002Second-Year Greek II3

Students with previous knowledge of Greek should consult the department for appropriate placement.

Italian

Courses in Italian are offered by the Department of French and Italian. Students without previous knowledge of Italian should fulfill the GE CLAS Core World Languages requirement with the following sequence.

ITAL:1101Elementary Italian I5
ITAL:1102Elementary Italian II5
ITAL:2203Intermediate Italian I4
ITAL:2204Intermediate Italian II4

Students with strong language learning abilities or a background in another Romance language may be able to complete the requirement by substituting ITAL:3002 Intensive Elementary Italian for ITAL:1101 and ITAL:1102 in the sequence above. Consult the department for appropriate placement.

Japanese

Courses in Japanese are offered by the Department of Asian and Slavic Languages and Literatures. For students without previous knowledge of Japanese, the department recommends the following sequence to fulfill the GE CLAS Core World Languages requirement.

JPNS:1001First-Year Japanese: First Semester5
JPNS:1002First-Year Japanese: Second Semester5
JPNS:2001Second-Year Japanese: First Semester5
JPNS:2002Second-Year Japanese: Second Semester5

Students may use varied combinations of Japanese language courses approved to fulfill the GE CLAS Core World Languages requirement. Those with previous knowledge of Japanese should consult the department for appropriate placement.

Korean

Courses in Korean are offered by the Department of Asian and Slavic Languages and Literatures. For students without previous knowledge of Korean, the department recommends the following sequence to fulfill the GE CLAS Core World Languages requirement.

KORE:1101First-Year Korean: First Semester4
KORE:1102First-Year Korean: Second Semester4
KORE:2101Second-Year Korean: First Semester4
KORE:2102Second-Year Korean: Second Semester4

Students with previous knowledge of Korean should consult the department for appropriate placement.

Latin

Courses in Latin are offered by the Department of Classics. Students without previous knowledge of Latin should fulfill the GE CLAS Core World Languages requirement with the following sequence. Students must take both CLSL:2001 and CLSL:2002 in order to fulfill the World Languages requirement. These courses require a similar knowledge of Latin, but one focuses on poetry and the other on prose. Other world languages permit a student to complete the last courses in the sequence to meet the GE CLAS Core requirement since the final course is more difficult than the previous ones. This is not true with the Latin sequence, and thus, both courses must be successfully completed.

CLSL:1001Elementary Latin I3-5
CLSL:1002Elementary Latin II3-5
CLSL:2001World of Cicero3
CLSL:2002Golden Age of Roman Poetry3

Students with previous knowledge of Latin should consult the department for appropriate placement.

Portuguese

Courses in Portuguese are offered by the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. Two sequences in Portuguese are approved to fulfill the GE CLAS Core World Languages requirement. All courses are open to entering first-year students.

PORT:2000Accelerated Elementary Portuguese5
PORT:2500Accelerated Intermediate Portuguese5

Students may also substitute PORT:2010 Elementary Portuguese I and PORT:2015 Elementary Portuguese II for PORT:2000 in the sequence above.

Students with previous knowledge of Portuguese should consult the department for appropriate placement.

Russian

Courses in Russian are offered by the Department of Asian and Slavic Languages and Literatures. Students without previous knowledge of Russian should fulfill the GE CLAS Core World Languages requirement with the following sequence.

RUSS:1111First-Year Russian I5
RUSS:1112First-Year Russian II5
RUSS:2111Second-Year Russian I4
RUSS:2112Second-Year Russian II4

Students with previous knowledge of Russian should consult the department for appropriate placement.

Sanskrit

Courses in Sanskrit are offered by the Department of Asian and Slavic Languages and Literatures. Students without previous knowledge of Sanskrit should fulfill the GE CLAS Core World Languages requirement with the following sequence. Each of these courses is open to entering first-year students.

SOAS:2901/CLSA:2901First-Year Sanskrit: First Semester4
SOAS:2902/CLSA:2902First-Year Sanskrit: Second Semester4
SOAS:3901/CLSA:3901Second-Year Sanskrit: First Semester3
SOAS:3902/CLSA:3902Second-Year Sanskrit: Second Semester3

Students with previous knowledge of Sanskrit should consult the department for appropriate placement.

Spanish

Courses in Spanish are offered by the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. For students without previous knowledge of Spanish, the department recommends the following sequence to fulfill the GE CLAS Core World Languages requirement.

SPAN:1001Elementary Spanish I5
SPAN:1002Elementary Spanish II5
SPAN:1501Intermediate Spanish I5
SPAN:1502Intermediate Spanish II5

Students may use varied combinations of Spanish language courses to fulfill the GE CLAS Core World Languages requirement. Those with previous knowledge of Spanish may be able to fulfill the requirement by substituting SPAN:1003 Elementary Spanish Review for SPAN:1001 and SPAN:1002 in the sequence above.

The accelerated course SPAN:1503 Accelerated Intermediate Spanish, which combines SPAN:1501 and SPAN:1502, may be appropriate for some students.

Iowa Center for Higher Education students may use the following sequence to fulfill the GE CLAS Core World Languages requirement.

CLAS:1002Elementary Spanish I4
CLAS:1003Elementary Spanish II4
CLAS:1501Intermediate Spanish I3
CLAS:1502Intermediate Spanish II3

Students with previous knowledge of Spanish should take the language placement test in Spanish to help determine proper placement.

Swahili

Courses in Swahili are offered by the Department of French and Italian. The following sequence fulfills the GE CLAS Core World Languages requirement. Each of these courses is open to entering first-year students.

SWAH:1001Elementary Swahili I4
SWAH:1002Elementary Swahili II4
SWAH:2001Intermediate Swahili I4
SWAH:2002Intermediate Swahili II4

Students with previous knowledge of Swahili should consult the department for appropriate placement.

Other Course Sequences

A student who successfully completes a four-semester world language sequence that has not been approved for the GE CLAS Core may have the sequence substituted for a proficiency test to fulfill the GE CLAS Core requirement.

Students who complete a world language sequence this way should notify the department that offers the sequence; the department will contact Graduation Analysis in the Office of the Registrar, which will update a student's degree audit to show fulfillment of the World Languages requirement.

Natural, Quantitative, and Social Sciences

Natural Sciences

Courses in the Natural Sciences area explore the scope and major concepts of a scientific discipline. Students learn the attitudes and practices of scientific investigators: logic, precision, experimentation, tentativeness, and objectivity. In courses with a laboratory component, students gain experience in the methods of scientific inquiry.

All students must complete at least 7 s.h. of course work in the Natural Sciences area, including at least one natural science lab component. The following courses are approved for the area; courses with a lab component are noted "(lab)."

ANTH:1301Human Origins3
ASTR:1060/BIOL:1060/EES:1060Big Ideas: Origins of the Universe, Earth, and Life3
ASTR:1070Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe (with lab 4 s.h.; without lab 3 s.h.)3-4
ASTR:1079Introductory Astronomy Laboratory (lab)1
ASTR:1080Exploration of the Solar System (with lab 4 s.h.; without lab 3 s.h.)3-4
ASTR:1091Life in the Universe3
ASTR:1771General Astronomy I (lab)4
ASTR:1772General Astronomy II (lab)4
BIOL:1061/ANTH:1061/ASTR:1061/EES:1061Big Ideas: Evolution of Life on Earth and the Search for Life in the Universe (lab)4
BIOL:1140Human Biology (lab)4
BIOL:1141Introductory Animal Biology (lab)4
BIOL:1251How the Brain Works (and Why it Doesn't)3
BIOL:1260Plants and Human Affairs2-3
BIOL:1261Introduction to Botany (lab)4
BIOL:1311/ANTH:1310Human Genetics in the Twenty-First Century3
BIOL:1370Understanding Evolution (formerly Ecology and Evolution)3
BIOL:1411Foundations of Biology (lab)4
BIOL:1412Diversity of Form and Function (lab)4
CHEM:1050Technology and Society3
CHEM:1060Technology and Society Laboratory (lab)1
CHEM:1070General Chemistry I3
CHEM:1080General Chemistry II3
CHEM:1100Chemistry in Industry and the Economy3
CHEM:1110Principles of Chemistry I (lab)4
CHEM:1120Principles of Chemistry II (lab)4
CHEM:1160Principles of Chemistry Lab (lab)2
CHEM:1180Chemical Science I3
CHEM:1190Chemical Science II3
CHEM:1200Chemical Science Laboratory (lab)2
EES:1030/CEE:1030Introduction to Earth Science (with lab 4 s.h.; without lab 3 s.h.)3-4
EES:1031/CEE:1031Introduction to Earth Science Laboratory (lab; students must have previously completed EES:1030/CEE:1030 without the lab)1
EES:1040Evolution and the History of Life (with lab 4 s.h.; without lab 3 s.h.)3-4
EES:1050Introduction to Geology (lab)4
EES:1070Age of Dinosaurs (lab)4
EES:1080/ENVS:1080Introduction to Environmental Science (with lab 4 s.h.; without lab 3 s.h.; not for students who have taken EES:1085 or ENVS:1085)3-4
EES:1085/ENVS:1085Fundamentals of Environmental Science (lab; not for students who have taken EES:1080 or ENVS:1080)4
EES:1081/ENVS:1081Introduction to Environmental Sciences Laboratory (lab)1
EES:1290Energy and the Environment3
EES:1400Natural Disasters3
GEOG:1020The Global Environment3
GEOG:1021The Global Environment Lab (lab)1
HHP:1100Human Anatomy3
HHP:1300Fundamentals of Human Physiology3
HHP:2310Nutrition and Health3
HONR:1640Honors Seminar in Natural Sciences3
MICR:1006Small Wonders: Microbes in Our Lives (GE status effective spring 2019)3
PHYS:1100From Quarks to Quasars (with lab 4 s.h.; without lab 3 s.h.)3-4
PHYS:1200Physics of Everyday Experience3
PHYS:1300Nanoscience3
PHYS:1400Basic Physics (with lab 4 s.h.; without lab 3 s.h.)3-4
PHYS:1409Basic Physics Lab (lab)1
PHYS:1410Physics of Sound (with lab 4 s.h.; without lab 3 s.h.)3-4
PHYS:1511College Physics I (lab)4
PHYS:1512College Physics II (lab)4
PHYS:1611Introductory Physics I (lab)4
PHYS:1612Introductory Physics II (with lab 4 s.h.; without lab 3 s.h.)3-4
PHYS:1619Introductory Physics II Lab (lab)1
PHYS:1701Physics I (lab)4
PHYS:1702Physics II (lab)4

Quantitative or Formal Reasoning

Courses in the Quantitative or Formal Reasoning area help develop analytical skills through the practice of quantitative or formal symbolic reasoning. Courses focus on presentation and evaluation of evidence and argument; understanding the use and misuse of data; and organization of information in quantitative or other formal symbolic systems, including those used in computer science, linguistics, mathematics, philosophy, and statistics.

All students must complete at least 3 s.h. of course work in the Quantitative or Formal Reasoning area. Students also may fulfill this GE CLAS Core requirement by completing a course that lists an approved GE CLAS Core course as a prerequisite. The following courses are approved for the area.

COMM:1117Theory and Practice of Argument4
CS:1020Principles of Computing3
CS:1110Introduction to Computer Science3
CS:1210Computer Science I: Fundamentals4
HHP:1030Introduction to Critical Thinking3
LING:1050Language and Formal Reasoning3
MATH:1020Elementary Functions4
MATH:1120Logic of Arithmetic4
MATH:1130Theory of Arithmetic3
MATH:1340Mathematics for Business4
MATH:1380Calculus and Matrix Algebra for Business4
MATH:1440Mathematics for the Biological Sciences4
MATH:1460Calculus for the Biological Sciences4
MATH:1550Engineering Mathematics I: Single Variable Calculus4
MATH:1850Calculus I4
PHIL:1636Principles of Reasoning: Argument and Debate3
POLI:1050/RELS:1050Big Ideas: Introduction to Information, Society, and Culture3
POLI:1700Introduction to Political Analysis3
PSY:2811Research Methods and Data Analysis in Psychology I (GE status effective fall 2018)3
STAT:1010Statistics and Society3
STAT:1020/PSQF:1020Elementary Statistics and Inference3
STAT:1030Statistics for Business4
STAT:2010Statistical Methods and Computing3

Social Sciences

Courses in the Social Sciences area focus on human behavior and the institutions and social systems that shape and are shaped by that behavior. Courses provide an overview of one or more social science disciplines, their theories, and their methods.

All students must complete at least 3 s.h. of course work in the Social Sciences area. The following courses are approved for the area.

AFAM:1030Introduction to African American Society3
ANTH:1101/IS:1101Cultural Anthropology3
ANTH:1401Language, Culture, and Communication3
ANTH:2100Anthropology and Contemporary World Problems3
ANTH:2136Urban Anthropology3
ANTH:2261Human Impacts on the Environment3
ASP:1800/CSD:1800/NURS:1800/SSW:1800/TR:1800Aging Matters: Introduction to Gerontology3
COMM:1170Communication Theory in Everyday Life3
COMM:1174Media and Society3
CPH:1400Fundamentals of Public Health3
CRIM:1410Introduction to Criminology3
CSD:3117/LING:3117Psychology of Language3
CSD:3118/LING:3118Language Acquisition1-3
ECON:1100Principles of Microeconomics4
ECON:1200Principles of Macroeconomics4
GEOG:1070Contemporary Environmental Issues3
GEOG:1090Globalization and Geographic Diversity3
GEOG:2110/GHS:2110Seven Billion and Counting: Introduction to Population Dynamics3
GEOG:2910The Global Economy3
HIST:1219/SOC:1219Big Ideas: Equality, Opportunity, and Public Policy in America3
HONR:1660Honors Seminar in Social Sciences3
JMC:1100Media Uses and Effects3
LING:1010Language and Society3
LING:1060Languages of the World3
MUSM:3001/ANTH:3001/EDTL:3001/SIED:3001Introduction to Museum Studies3
POLI:1100Introduction to American Politics3
POLI:1200Introduction to Political Behavior3
POLI:1300Introduction to Political Thought and Action3
POLI:1400Introduction to Comparative Politics3
POLI:1401Introduction to the Politics of Russia and Eurasia3
POLI:1403Introduction to Politics in the Muslim World3
POLI:1445Introduction to Asian Politics: China3
POLI:1449Introduction to European Politics3
POLI:1500Introduction to International Relations3
POLI:1501Introduction to American Foreign Policy3
POLI:1600Introduction to Political Communication3
POLI:2415/LAS:2415Latin American Politics3
PSQF:2115Introduction to Counseling Psychology (GE status effective spring 2019)3
PSY:1001Elementary Psychology3
PSY:2301Introduction to Clinical Psychology3
PSY:2401Introduction to Developmental Science3
PSY:2601Introduction to Cognitive Psychology3
SOC:1010Introduction to Sociology3-4
SOC:1020Social Problems3-4
SOC:1220Principles of Social Psychology3-4
TR:1070Perspectives on Leisure and Play3

Culture, Society, and the Arts

Diversity and Inclusion

Courses in the Diversity and Inclusion area help to develop students’ recognition of their positions in an increasingly pluralistic world while fostering an understanding of social and cultural differences. Students reflect critically on their own social and cultural perspectives while increasing their ability to engage with people who have backgrounds or ideas different from their own. Students also explore the historical and structural bases of inequality and the benefits and challenges of diversity.

Transfer credit is not accepted for the Diversity and Inclusion requirement; students must complete this requirement with course work taken at the University of Iowa.

All students must complete at least 3 s.h. of course work in the Diversity and Inclusion area. The following courses are approved for the area.

AFAM:2500Black Culture and Experience: Contemporary Issues3
AMST:2025Diversity in American Culture3
ANTH:2151/GWSS:2151/IS:2151Global Migration in the Contemporary World (GE status effective fall 2018)3
ANTH:2165/AMST:2165/NAIS:2165Native Peoples of North America3
ARTS:2100Printmaking and Politics of Protest3
CCCC:2220Foundations of Critical Cultural Competence3
CSD:1200Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities3
CINE:1195Video Games and Identity3
CINE:1625Race, Gender, and Sexuality on Screen3
CL:2222/ASIA:2222/GWSS:2222Women in Premodern East Asian Literature3
CL:2700/RUSS:2232Romani (Gypsy) Cultures of Eastern Europe3
COMM:1898/LAS:1898/LATS:1898Introduction to Latina/o/x Communication and Culture3
DANC:2065Performing Crisis: Dances of Identity, Witness, and Resistance3
DST:1101Introduction to Disability Studies3
GRMN:2620Anne Frank and Her Story3-4
GRMN:2675The Politics of Memory: Holocaust, Genocide, and 9/113-4
GWSS:1002Diversity and Power in the U.S. (GE status effective fall 2018)3
HIST:1040Diversity in History3
HIST:2267/AFAM:2267African American History to 1877: From Slave Cabin to Senate Floor3
IS:2020World Events Today!3
ITAL:2660The Italian American Experience (GE status effective fall 2018)3
JMC:2500Community Media (GE status effective fall 2018)3
JMC:2600Freedom of Expression3
LATS:2280/HIST:2280/SPAN:2280Introduction to Latina/o Studies3
NAIS:1290/AMST:1290/GHS:1290/HIST:1290Native American Foods and Foodways (GE status effective fall 2018)3
POLI:1601Introduction to Social Media and Politics3
POLI:1800Introduction to the Politics of Class and Inequality3
POLI:1900Introduction to the Politics of Race3
POLI:1950Introduction to the Politics of Religion (GE status effective spring 2019)3
RELS:2620Politics, Sex, and the Bible (GE status effective spring 2019)3
SPAN:2050/LATS:2050Spanish in the U.S. (GE status effective spring 2019)3
SRM:1045Diversity and Inclusion in Healthy Living (GE status effective fall 2018)3
SPST:1074/AMST:1074/GWSS:1074Inequality in American Sport3
THTR:2320Playwriting in a Global World3
THTR:2405Staging Americans: U.S. Cultures Through Theatre and Performance3
WLLC:1200/DST:1200/GHS:1200/GRMN:1200Disability and Inclusion in Film and Writing Around the World3
WRIT:2100Writing and Community Outreach3

Historical Perspectives

Courses in the Historical Perspectives area help students comprehend the historical processes of change and continuity; develop the ability to generalize, explain, and interpret historical change; and understand the past in its own terms.

All students must complete at least 3 s.h. of course work in the Historical Perspectives area. The following courses are approved for the area.

ANTH:1201World Archaeology3
ARTH:1010Art and Visual Culture3
ARTH:1050From Cave Paintings to Cathedrals: Survey of Western Art I3
ARTH:1060From Mona Lisa to Modernism: Survey of Western Art II3
ARTH:1070/CHIN:1070Asian Art and Culture3
ARTH:1090Earthly Paradises: A Global History of Gardens3
ARTH:2920Introduction to American Art3
CLSA:1181/GHS:1181Ancient Medicine3
CLSA:1830Greek Civilization3
CLSA:1840Roman Civilization3
CLSA:2127/JPNS:2127Global Manuscript Cultures (GE status effective spring 2019)3
EES:1115/ENVS:1115/GEOG:1115/HIST:1115The History and Science of Oil3
FREN:3120French Civilization3
HIST:1002Issues in Medieval Society3
HIST:1004Issues in Human History: Communities and Society in History3
HIST:1008Issues in European Politics and Society3
HIST:1010History Matters3
HIST:1014Issues: Twentieth-Century Crisis3
HIST:1016The History That Made Our World3
HIST:1261American History to 18773
HIST:1262American History 1877-Present3
HIST:1401The West and the World: Ancient3-4
HIST:1402The West and the World: Medieval3-4
HIST:1403The West and the World: Modern3-4
HIST:1602/ASIA:1602Civilizations of Asia: China3
HIST:1604/ASIA:1604Civilizations of Asia: Japan3-4
HIST:1606/ASIA:1606Civilizations of Asia: South Asia3-4
HIST:1607Civilizations of Asia: Korea3-4
HIST:2461/CLSA:2461/RELS:2361Middle East and Mediterranean: Alexander to Suleiman3
HONR:1610Honors Seminar in Historical Perspectives3
ITAL:2550Images of Modern Italy3
JMC:1200Media History and Culture3
MUS:1303Roots, Rock, and Rap: A History of Popular Music3
MUS:2301History of Music I3
MUS:2302History of Music II3
PHIL:1033The Meaning of Life3
PHIL:1034Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness3
RELS:1001Judaism, Christianity, and Islam3
RELS:1225/HIST:1025Medieval Religion and Culture3
RELS:1250/HIST:1050Modern Religion and Culture3
RUSS:1531Slavic Folklore3
RUSS:1532Religion and Culture of Slavs3
THTR:1400Theatre and Society: Ancients and Moderns3
THTR:1401Theatre and Society: Romantics and Rebels3
THTR:2410History of Theatre and Drama I3
THTR:2411History of Theatre and Drama II3

International and Global Issues

Courses in the International and Global Issues area focus predominantly on countries or issues outside the United States, encouraging students to understand contemporary issues from an international perspective. Students develop knowledge of one or more contemporary global or international issues, gain a greater awareness of varied international perspectives, and improve their skills of analysis and critical inquiry.

All students must complete at least 3 s.h. of course work in the International and Global Issues area. The following courses are approved for the area.

ANTH:1046/GEOG:1046/GWSS:1046Big Ideas: People and the Environment - Technology, Culture, and Social Justice3
ANTH:2100Anthropology and Contemporary World Problems3
ANTH:2136Urban Anthropology3
ANTH:2261Human Impacts on the Environment3
ARTH:1040Arts of Africa3
FREN:1006Global Sports and National Cultures3
FREN:1510Cultural Misunderstandings: France and U.S.A.3
GEOG:1060Geography of Asia: From Japan to Pakistan3
GEOG:1070Contemporary Environmental Issues3
GEOG:1090Globalization and Geographic Diversity3
GEOG:2910The Global Economy3
GHS:2000/ANTH:2103Introduction to Global Health Studies (GE status effective spring 2019)3
GRMN:2720/HIST:2420Germany in the World3
GRMN:4315Contemporary German Civilization3
HIST:1016The History That Made Our World3
HIST:1403The West and the World: Modern3-4
HIST:1602/ASIA:1602Civilizations of Asia: China3
HIST:1604/ASIA:1604Civilizations of Asia: Japan3-4
HIST:1606/ASIA:1606Civilizations of Asia: South Asia3-4
HIST:1607Civilizations of Asia: Korea3-4
HONR:1620Honors Seminar in International and Global Issues3
IS:2000Introduction to International Studies3
ITAL:2770The Mafia and the Movies (GE status effective spring 2019)3
LING:1040/ANTH:1040Language Rights3
POLI:1400Introduction to Comparative Politics3
POLI:1401Introduction to the Politics of Russia and Eurasia3
POLI:1403Introduction to Politics in the Muslim World3
POLI:1445Introduction to Asian Politics: China3
POLI:1449Introduction to European Politics3
POLI:1500Introduction to International Relations3
POLI:1501Introduction to American Foreign Policy3
POLI:2415/LAS:2415Latin American Politics3
RELS:1130/HIST:1030Introduction to Islamic Civilization3
RELS:2852/GWSS:2052Women in Islam and the Middle East3
RELS:3855/IS:3855Human Rights and Islam3
RUSS:1132Russia Today3
SPST:2170Sport and Globalization3

Literary, Visual, and Performing Arts

Courses in the Literary, Visual, and Performing Arts area provide students with opportunities to appreciate the arts and to analyze them within their historical and theoretical contexts. They also help students develop the analytic, expressive, and imaginative abilities necessary for understanding, appreciating, and creating art.

All students must complete at least 3 s.h. of course work in the Literary, Visual, and Performing Arts area. The following courses are approved for the area.

ARTH:1010Art and Visual Culture3
ARTH:1020Masterpieces: Art in Historical and Cultural Perspectives3
ARTH:1040Arts of Africa3
ARTH:1050From Cave Paintings to Cathedrals: Survey of Western Art I3
ARTH:1060From Mona Lisa to Modernism: Survey of Western Art II3
ARTH:1070/CHIN:1070Asian Art and Culture3
ARTH:1095American Indian Art3
ARTH:2920Introduction to American Art3
ARTS:1010Elements of Art3
ARTS:1030Elements of Jewelry and Metal Arts3
ARTS:1050Elements of Printmaking3
ARTS:1080Elements of Sculpture3
CERM:2010Exploring Forms in Clay I3
CHIN:1702Chinese Popular Culture3
CINE:1100The Art of Smartphone Filmmaking3
CINE:1602Introduction to Film Studies3
CINE:1610Contemporary Cinema3
CL:1240/CLSA:1040Major Texts of World Literature, Antiquity to 17003
CL:1241Major Texts of World Literature, 1700 to the Present3
CLSA:1010Hero, God, Mortal: Literature of Greece3
CLSA:1020Love and Glory: The Literature of Rome3
CLSA:1740/WRIT:1740Writing Strategies: Word Origins and Word Choice3
CLSA:2016Classical Mythology3
CNW:1620Introduction to Creative Nonfiction3
CW:1800Creative Writing Studio Workshop3
DANC:1010Beginning Tap2
DANC:1020Beginning Jazz2
DANC:1030Beginning Ballet2
DANC:1040Beginning Modern Dance2
DANC:1110Continuing Tap1-2
DANC:1120Continuing Jazz2
DANC:1130Continuing Ballet2
DANC:1140Continuing Modern Dance2
DANC:2020Intermediate Jazz2
DANC:2030Intermediate Ballet1-2
DANC:2040Intermediate Modern2
DANC:2060/DPA:2060Dance and Society in Global Contexts3
EDTL:2122Creativity, Imagination, Play, and Human Development through the Arts3
ENGL:1320Heroes and Villains3
ENGL:1330The Art of Storytelling3
ENGL:1345American Lives3
ENGL:1350Literature and Sexualities3
FREN:4100French Cinema3-4
GRMN:2630German Cinema: Greatest Hits3-4
GRMN:2666/CL:2666Pact with the Devil3
GRMN:2775Scandinavian Crime Fiction3
GRMN:2785Cyborgs, Monsters, and the Uncanny3
HONR:1630Honors Seminar in Literary, Visual, and Performing Arts3
MUS:1001Group Piano I: Non-Music Majors1
MUS:1009Jazz Cultures in America and Abroad3
MUS:1012Creativity in Music3
MUS:1020Performance Instruction for Nonmajors1
MUS:1066Introduction to Film Music3
MUS:1301Concepts and Contexts of Western Music3
MUS:1302Great Musicians3
MUS:1310World Music3
MUS:1720History of Jazz3
MUS:1800/DPA:1800World of the Beatles3
MUS:2005Issues in Popular Music: Women Who Rock3
MUS:2301History of Music I3
MUS:2302History of Music II3
MUS:2311/LAS:2311Music of Latin America and the Caribbean3
PORT:2850/SPAN:2850Brazilian Narrative in Translation3
SCLP:2810Undergraduate Sculpture I3
SPAN:1700/LATS:1700Latino/a Literature in the U.S.3
SPAN:1800Contemporary Spanish American Narrative3
THTR:1140Basic Acting3
THTR:1400Theatre and Society: Ancients and Moderns3
THTR:1401Theatre and Society: Romantics and Rebels3
THTR:1412/DANC:1412/DPA:1412The Arts in Performance3
THTR:2301Playwriting I3
THTR:2410History of Theatre and Drama I3
THTR:2411History of Theatre and Drama II3

Values and Culture

Courses in the Values and Culture area focus on how culture shapes the human experience and the role of values in society, with students asking fundamental questions regarding the human experience while exploring their own values and beliefs.

All students must complete at least 3 s.h. of course work in the Values and Culture area. The following courses are approved for the area.

AFAM:1020/AMST:1030Introduction to African American Culture3
AFAM:1030Introduction to African American Society3
AMST:1010Understanding American Cultures3
AMST:1154Food in America3
AMST:2000Introduction to American Studies3
ANTH:1101/IS:1101Cultural Anthropology3
ANTH:2175/JPNS:2175Japanese Society and Culture3
ARTH:1030Themes in Global Art3
ARTH:1045Race and Art in America3
ARTH:1095American Indian Art3
ARTS:2000/ASP:2000/EDTL:2000/RHET:2000Big Ideas: Creativity for a Lifetime3
ASIA:2450India Beat: The Aesthetics and Politics of India Today3
CHIN:1504Asian Humanities: China3
CLSA:1340Magic in the Ancient World3
CLSA:1875Ancient Sports and Leisure3
CLSA:1883/HONR:1883War3
CLSA:2016Classical Mythology3
CLSA:2482/RELS:2182Ancient Mediterranean Religions3
CLSA:2651/GWSS:2651Gender and Sexuality in the Ancient World3
COMM:1174Media and Society3
DANC:1150/LAS:1150Brazilian Culture and Carnival3
ENGL:1420Technologies and Literatures of the Future3
EPLS:4180Human Relations for the Classroom Teacher3
GRMN:2550/WLLC:2550Mardi Gras and More: Cultures of Carnival3-4
GRMN:2618/CL:2618The Third Reich and Literature3
GRMN:2650German Nationalism After WWII3-4
GRMN:2655/IS:2600Muslim Minorities in the West3-4
GWSS:1001Introduction to Gender, Women's, and Sexuality Studies3
GWSS:1060/AMST:1060/ENGL:1410Sex and Popular Culture in America3
HHP:2200Physical Activity and Health3
HIST:1609India Now! A Survey from Bollywood Films to Global Terror3-4
HIST:1708Civilizations of Africa3
ITAL:2550Images of Modern Italy3
JMC:1500Social Media Today3
JPNS:1506Asian Humanities: Japan3
LING:2900Language, Gender, and Sexuality3
MUS:1009Jazz Cultures in America and Abroad3
MUS:1720History of Jazz3
MUS:2311/LAS:2311Music of Latin America and the Caribbean3
NAIS:1049Introduction to American Indian and Native Studies3
PHIL:1401Matters of Life and Death3
PHIL:1861Introduction to Philosophy3
PHIL:2402Introduction to Ethics3
POLI:1300Introduction to Political Thought and Action3
RELS:1070Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament3
RELS:1080Introduction to the New Testament3
RELS:1130/HIST:1030Introduction to Islamic Civilization3
RELS:1350/AFAM:1250Introduction to African American Religions3
RELS:1404/ASIA:1040/HIST:1610Living Religions of the East3
RELS:1506/ASIA:1060/HIST:1612Introduction to Buddhism3
RELS:1702Religion in America Today3
RELS:1810Happiness in a Difficult World3
RELS:1903Quest for Human Destiny3
RELS:2700/NAIS:2700Sacred World of Native Americans3
RELS:2852/GWSS:2052Women in Islam and the Middle East3
RELS:2986Religion and Women3
RUSS:1082Youth Subcultures After Socialism3
RUSS:1131Introduction to Russian Culture3
RUSS:1132Russia Today3
RUSS:1531Slavic Folklore3
RUSS:1532Religion and Culture of Slavs3
RUSS:2100Secrets of Russian Mentality3
SOAS:1502/RELS:1502Asian Humanities: India3
SOC:1310/GWSS:1310Gender and Society3-4
SOC:2710The American Family3
SOC:2810Social Inequality3
SPAN:1700/LATS:1700Latino/a Literature in the U.S.3
SPAN:1900Diversity and Cultures in Spain3
SRM:1072Leisure and the Liberal Arts3
SSW:1022/SOC:1022Social Justice and Social Welfare in the United States3
THTR:1411Comedy and Society3
THTR:1412/DANC:1412/DPA:1412The Arts in Performance3

Four-Year Graduation Plan

The following checkpoints list the minimum requirements students must complete by certain semesters in order to stay on the University's Four-Year Graduation Plan. Courses in the major are those required to complete the major; they may be offered by departments other than the major department.

Before the fifth semester begins: at least four courses in the major

Before the seventh semester begins: at least four more courses in the major (total of eight) and at least 90 s.h. earned toward the degree

Before the eighth semester begins: at least three more courses in the major (total of 11)

During the eighth semester: enrollment in all remaining course work in the major, all remaining GE CLAS Core courses, and a sufficient number of semester hours to graduate

Sample Plan of Study

Sample plans represent one way to complete a program of study. Actual course selection and sequence will vary and should be discussed with an academic advisor. For additional sample plans, see MyUI.

Art, B.A.

Plan of Study Grid (Manual)
First Year
FallHours
ARTS:1510 Basic Drawing a 3
ARTS:1520 Design Fundamentals a 3
RHET:1030
Rhetoric
or The Interpretation of Literature
3 - 4
GE CLAS Core: Diversity and Inclusion b 3
CSI:1600 Success at Iowa 2
 Hours14-15
Spring
RHET:1030
Rhetoric
or The Interpretation of Literature
3 - 4
Major: art history survey course c 3
Major: introductory-level studio 2-D course d 3
GE CLAS Core: Natural Sciences with Lab b 4
Elective course e 2
 Hours15-16
Second Year
Fall
Major: art history survey course c 3
Major: introductory-level studio 3-D course f 3
Major: non-art elective course 1 - 2
GE CLAS Core: Quantitative or Formal Reasoning b 3
GE CLAS Core: World Languages First Level Proficiency or elective course g 4 - 5
Elective course e 2
 Hours16-18
Spring
Major: art history non-survey course h 3
Major: introductory-level studio 2-D course d 3
Major: introductory-level studio 3-D course f 3
GE CLAS Core: World Languages Second Level Proficiency or elective g 4 - 5
Elective course e 3
 Hours16-17
Third Year
Fall
Major: art history non-survey course h 3
Major: elective art course i 3 - 4
Major: upper-level studio art course j 3 - 4
GE CLAS Core: Natural Sciences without Lab b 3
GE CLAS Core: World Languages Second Level Proficiency or elective course g 4 - 5
 Hours16-19
Spring
Major: elective art course i 3
Major: upper-level studio art course j 3
GE CLAS Core: International and Global Issues or elective b 3
GE CLAS Core: World Languages Fourth Level Proficiency or elective course g 4 - 5
Elective course e 3
 Hours16-17
Fourth Year
Fall
Major: elective art course i 3
GE CLAS Core: Literary, Visual, and Performing Arts or elective course b, k 3
GE CLAS Core: Values and Culture b 3
Elective course e 3
Elective course e 3
 Hours15
Spring
Major: elective art and art history course i 3
GE CLAS Core: Historical Perspectives b 3
GE CLAS Core: Social Sciences b 3
Elective course e 3
Elective course e 3
 Hours15
 Total Hours123-132

Many graduates pursue careers that match their degree specializations, for example, commercial or graphic designer, conservation or museum curator or administrator, art educator, public artist, or community art center coordinator or instructor. Others go on to graduate study in areas such as art history, art therapy, architecture, design, medical illustration, studio art, or disciplines outside of art.

The Pomerantz Career Center offers multiple resources to help students find internships and jobs.